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I started drawing at the age of 5. I studied painting and advertising drawing. I had the opportunity to exhibit and sell some paintings, thanks to the goodwill of the people who helped me to achieve it. In 2010, I decided to change the frame and the brush for the experience of expressing my artistic motivation in clothes. I thought that maybe this way I could expose and sell my creations in a more practical way. I became a design student of clothing and textiles in a well-known institute in Buenos Aires called Escuela Argentina de Moda (@eamoda). There, I ventured into design and textile art. The whole thing was incredible and new to me. The knowledge I was acquiring allowed me to express ideas about clothing that I was gradually learning to make. I was discovering amazing techniques and products, so I started to make the first prints that we designed in the workshops of the school; everything was just as I had imagined it. At the same time, I was working in a factory that produced orthopedic devices, where I handled elements of manufacture, machinery, and various materials.

Little by little, I discovered that everything could be merged, that both activities could come together, and I began to mix screen printing techniques and industrial procedures on materials such as acrylic, which is light and delicate. I discovered that, in this material, you can practice all kinds of interventions; all that is ideal to generate bijouterie products. The design helped me to direct the ideas and, with the creation of the first pieces, I discovered more and more resources and new techniques. So we were making a variety of models of bracelets, necklaces, hoops, and headdresses along with my second-year design teacher, Maria Ines Sanchez, who is also the director of VIBRADIOS (@vibradios_fashiondesign), an independent maraca of alternative clothing with great style. She was the one who encouraged me to make the first acrylic accessories for your brand. This concept was already incorporated in their collections, and my work fit perfectly. This is how my art project on garments started taking the form of acrylic accessories and accessories that began to have very good reception in all the places where we presented them.

A group of talented photographers such as ARLEY VALDEZ ESTUDIO (@arleyvaldezstudio) and SUCCO ESTUDIO (@succostudio), including beautiful models such as LINDA HELENA (@thelinda), PERLA PERREN (@perlaperren), and male models like EMANUEL DEL VALLE (@emanuel.delvalle71) were part of the incredible production team that I had the privilege to work with. Stylists and make-up artists that we contacted for the fashion events in my city were added to our circle. In this way, the first photographic productions began and we received the first invitations to exhibit at all events in Buenos Aires. Thanks to Escuela Argentina de Moda, I had the opportunity to participate in the events organized by GUILLERMO AZAR (@guillermoazarok) and the BAAM (@buenosairesaltamoda) catwalk, which are the most important parades in Argentina. Thanks to the management of the school, its teachers, and talented graduates, including PAULA TIERR (@paulatierr) and ROSARIO CH (@rosario_ch_designer), these accessories were always present at the classic Fashion Week events in Argentina. There were social and editorial networks such as REFLEX HOMME

(@reflexhomme), DHR MODELS (@dhrmodels), and others such as NUBILIS MAG (@revistanubilis) and PARA TI MAG (@paratirevista). There were more collaborations with NADIA ABAL (@abalnadiph), YEX SCHULZ (@yexschulzphotography), and also many other talented photographers of the reputable institute of fashion photography directed by ADRIAN FAGUETTI (@adrianfaguetti). They improved our brand’s image through their incredible productions. As a result, I had the opportunity to meet great artists and designers like JUAN VITTO (@juan_vitto) and JORGE SANDOVAL (@jorgesandovaldesigner). They have helped me to grow a lot and have always included me in their projects. They allowed SO'G (@sebaogorman) to be part of their collections and brought these accessories to very important and high-class studios, such as MAO COLLAZOS (@maocollazos), FUENTES & FERNANDEZ (@f2f_ph), MACHADO CICALA MORASSUT (@machadocicala), and LISSANDRO KAELL (@lissandrokaell). Also, beautiful models such as CONI MOSQUEIRA (@coni_mosqueira), NANCI RODRIGUEZ (@nachurod), SOFIA ZAMOLO (@sofiazamolo), JULI ROSSA (@julirossa), INGRID GRUDKE (@ingridgrudke), including actresses like CELINA RUCCI (@celinarucciok), BELEN POUCHAN (@belupouchan), and ESTELA RIBEIRO (@estelabroficial) exhibited these accessories in incredible productions. My designer friends gave me the opportunity to show my pieces at fashion shows such as SIX O’ CLOCK TEA (@sixoclocktea) and events like HECTOR VIDAL RIVAS (@hectorvidalrivas), among others. I must also mention that I was lucky to run into the best producers, stylists, and bookers in my country; SEBAS CRUZ CENTENO (@sebacruzcenteno), VICKY VIDAL (@vivitlab), and MILLI RICARDINI (@millie.styling) are some of these great professionals who work for the world of fashion and TV in Argentina. Top-notch artists and make-up artists such as MABBY AUTINO (@mabbypromakeup), EDU LAJETZKY (@edhuss07), LEO COSENZA (@leo.cosenza), and GUSTABO CEJAS (@gustavocejas.gc) are some of these great artists of aesthetics with whom I had the privilege of sharing some production and I can’t stop mentioning them.

I can’t cite all the important people with whom I was lucky and privileged to work with, but I want to use this opportunity to make public my deep gratitude to everyone who make up part of the history of our brand. The most important things for me are the people around me, friends, relatives, and all those who make the realization of dreams and continuity possible. Each year, they present new challenges. The work of magazines and publishers like McGlory is essential to reach the international audience of the fashion world. Like one great musician in my country would say, “Total Thanks.”

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1. What made you decide to design clothes?

As a designer, I have always pondered how my creation impacts the end user. My goal is to deliver the feel-good factor in and out. Fashion, as we all know, is the second most populated industry in the world. I never planned to become a fashion designer, but I have social statements to pass on, and fashion is one of the best platforms I could find to do that.

2. Do you design for a particular body type or with a particular woman in mind?

The Rushing Hour styles are designed for the value-driven women by providing clothing that’s easy to mix and match and is environmentally beneficial. The collection is tailored to be timeless with a minimalist sensibility and a polished edginess. It's versatile enough to go from office smart to street sleek with ease.

3. Who is your favorite Fashion Designer?

Actually, I have two, and they are Alexander Wang and Alexander McQueen.

4. Who are the other people you admire in other fields?

Music is a big part of where my inspiration comes from. I love Sigur Ros, Pink Floyd, Massive Attack, and Nothing but Thieves.

5. What would you say is your greatest accomplishment so far?

Running and maintaining the entire business on my own while working another job.

6. Where do you see yourself in 10 years?

I probably won’t be in the fashion industry for too long, but I’ll definitely still be doing some work to inspire people in some way or to help those in need.

7. Do you have any words of advice for readers of McGlory Fashion Magazine?

Ask questions when you shop! Do some research on what brand is doing their part to benefit the environment and the people. Support those brands and spread the word. One single designer can’t change the industry alone — an army of consumers alongside that designer can force a shift of belief in our society.

8. At what age did you become fascinated with fashion?

Maybe around age 6. My sister would outgrow her clothes and they’d become new clothes for me. After I outgrew those clothes, they became materials I used to sew into new outfits for dolls.

9. How did you prepare for a career in styling?

By always being curious and never afraid to try out new things. I’m a minimalist fan but I also love good vintage fashion pieces. Combining the different styles challenges my creativity. Most importantly, I love having fun.

10. How do you get updated on the current trends?

I don’t. I refuse to pay attention to current trends, which means my designs are based on classic silhouettes with a twist.

11. How important is Fashion Week for you?

To be honest, I don’t really follow what’s happening in the Fashion Weeks. Occasionally, I’d check out what’s happening on the runway on Pinterest.

12. What is your dream job?

Travelling the world to help those in need.

13. How important is communication between yourself and the photographer that you’ll be working with? What sorts of things do you do to prepare yourself for on an upcoming shoot?

It all starts with a mood board and the women I want to portray in the story. I prefer to leave creative rooms to the photographer, as that’s the best way to achieve a great partnership.

14. What are your plans for the future?

My goal this year is to continue growing the business organically and hopefully chat with retailers overseas about The Rushing Hour.

15. Name the top three things in your styling kit that are must-haves?

Red lipstick. Classic white shirt. Good hair

16. Advice for the up-and-coming fashion stylists out there?

Come up with your own trends. Go out and talk to the brands you’d love to work with. Mix and match everything. Enjoy the ride and try not to follow the trend too much.

17. Favorite all-time designer?

Alexander McQueen!

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1. At what age did you become interested in Photography?

Pretty late, I bought my first professional camera at the age of 35.

2. How did you start your career? What were some of the hurdles you encountered at the beginning?

I was lucky, I designed a website for an Austrian magazine and being a photographer is more like a hobby for me. One day, I showed the editor in chief my photos and she loved them. So she asked me to shoot her future covers and photo hauls.

3. Did you go to college for Photography?

No. At the point when I recognized that I love shooting photos, I visited a few interesting workshops and refined my skills.

4. Why did you decide to become a Fashion Photographer?

I love working with a lot of different people, I love being creative with my team and mostly, I love creating something that arises in my head.

5. Do you remember your very first Fashion shoot?

Oufff.. I remember my first cover shoot and I also remember that I could not sleep the night before because I was very nervous. *laughs*

6. Do you remember your first job, and what followed afterwards?

That's difficult to say. My first job was a 1-year-engagement for a magazine.

7. Have you traveled much throughout your career? What are some of your favorite

locations that you’ve shot in?

Unfortunately, no. But I hope I will soon. I'm going to shoot in Berlin in every case next year. The city is so inspiring.

8. Who are your favorite photographers?

There are so many good photographers. It's hard to say. But few of my favourites are Mario Testino, Kristian Schuller, Ellen von Unwerth, Rankin, and Terry Richardson.

9. Were your parents supportive? Were they artistic?

My parents do their best but they can't understand the business, I think. But I have a lot of support from my friends. A honest feedback is really important to me.

10. What kind of DSLR do you shoot with?

It depends on what I'm going to shoot. I started with a Nikon D90, which I still love to use. But for really important shootings, I certainly use a full frame camera.

11. What is your proudest moment so far?

When I was allowed to shoot for Philipp Plein recently. :)

12. Do you belong to any Photography Associations or groups?

Unfortunately, no. I don't have enough time at the moment.

17. What kind of skills do you need (outside of being really talented at shooting) to make it in this industry?

You absolutely need a good network. Good photos are useless if nobody sees them. You also need to know where to get good fashion, makeup

artists, and models from.

18. How do you market yourself to your clients?

I luckily have a good network but I also market myself through advertising and publishing my stuff in magazines.

19. What are some important things young Photographers should know in order to get and retain clients?

Good planning and careful work is always important. If that fits, it also fits on the customer side. In the end, the most important thing is that the customer is satisfied and happy.

21. What has been the worse job you’ve ever shot?

A driver. It had horrible working hours and payment.

22. Is it really glamorous as the media makes it out to be?

I think if you are successful as an artist, things fall in place by themselves. But of course, you have the privilege to meet and shoot the most beautiful fashion with the most beautiful people. So I would say it's both. It's hard work AND it's glamorous.

23. What advice would you give to a young Photographer who is just starting out?

Photograph everything, except fashion. It's the most difficult aspect in this job.

24. Who do you love shooting most, men or women?

Women. *laugh*

25. Are you working on anything at the moment, either for a client, or for personal?

At the moment, I'm planning the next big shooting. I'm super excited because it has always been one of my biggest dreams to do a photo-shoot in a private jet.

26. (Random question outside of Photography): Beatles or Stones?

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"I started my brand, Caroline Perino, around the end of 2017, which coincided with my graduation at a Masters in Fashion from Kingston University, London. It all happened very fast, to be honest. During the last term of my Masters, and among a class of over 40 MA Fashion students from the whole world, my MA collection was selected as one of the few to be showcased publicly representing Kingston University. That was a golden opportunity for me because after that, the fashion industry doors started opening for me and my brand. That year, I was also sponsored by the crystal’s company, Swarovski, which I am forever grateful to. From there, I was invited to show during London Fashion Week which held a competition called Britain’s Top Designer Award, and for which I was luckily selected as a finalist. Then I was invited to show in New York Fashion Week, which happened earlier this year in September, where I showed my Summer/Spring 2019 collection. One event was followed by the other, and to have big media brands such as Vogue to note my brand, also helped the success of my brand to grow. I never thought I would be a fashion designer. My whole family is constituted of medical doctors, and I was put on pressure to become a doctor as well, so I always thought I was going to be one. It wasn’t until a very good friend saw my fashion drawings and asked me “why hadn’t I thought of being a fashion designer”, then I started to think about it. Drawing has been part of my life since I was very little, and as a shy and quiet girl, drawing was my happy moment, the moment where I could dream and simply enjoy that happy moment of the day. If I could give an advice to anyone willing to be a fashion designer or struggling in this industry, I would tell this person to be clever, to be aware of the industry, and to hold on every single opportunity they are given. Our industry is full of false people trying to take advantage of you and your creations, so young designers need to be always cautious with regards to who they let approach their work, whether it is a company or an individual. And I believe it is also important to invest in opportunities with the contacts and people you meet in your journey. Networking is super useful, and you might find opportunities where you least expect it! So it is always a good idea to have a business card ready with you wherever you go. Apart from that, enjoy the ride, because every struggle you make now will pay off later."

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Why did you start your brand?

I started my Label “Oneiric” at the end of my final year of study in 2015. I had worked really hard at developing my final year collection and I ultimately fell in love with the process of making a collection. My collection was well received and I made custom pieces for customers once they had seen the collection. “Oneiric” started as a custom made/made to order brand and then I decided to continue developing collections that are made in small runs. At the beginning, I really didn’t know a lot about the business side of running a Label and kind of got into it very naively. The one thing that really pushed me to learn and make the brand come to life was my passion for my craft and design vision. To me “Oneiric” represents more than clothes; it is a little world and attitude that allows me and others the hope to fantasise and escape from the norm. The word Oneiric means to be in an unconscious state of mind; a dream state. I’m a big daydreamer and I think a lot of my creativity comes from that really pure and natural state of fantasising, I think that is why a lot of my pieces are perceived to be romantic and whimsical.

Over time, I have been able to really build on my craft and work on the fit and quality of my pieces. The design vision works hand in hand with the technicality of producing clothes. I do really enjoy researching and drafting patterns for collections, than developing the samples for production. I guess it’s a very intimate process because everything has my signature on it and this is what I am ultimately sharing with others.

What did it take to build your brand?

Building a brand requires a lot of patience and drive. When I first started the Label, I really didn’t know what I was getting into. The one thing that pushed me to learn was that drive to succeed. I had to learn to not only be the designer; I carried out many roles, from marketing to doing the accounting.

At first, the collections were more experimental and avant-garde, and they progressed to having more basic pieces as well. In some way, you need to have commercial elements within collections; your items have to be functional and versatile.

Instagram was an amazing tool for expressing my brand identity and aesthetic. It was also a great way to connect to new customers and other designers in Melbourne and around the world. You can really be surprised by opportunities that can arise through social media. I was able to show my S/S 2017 collection in a Paris showroom in 2017 from the network I had developed.

Looking back on my experience, the major point I carry is that you can’t be afraid of putting yourself in an uncomfortable position; you have to take every opportunity no matter how unnerving it may be. The only way you progress and learn is to make mistakes and improve. Always try and find the right people for advice and not everyone is going to like what you do or understand it, so follow your intuition.

What is your team further developing for the future?

We are looking to develop more knitwear in the future. One of my great passions is knitwear and I would like to do a few more experimental pieces with knit and embroidery. I love using really unique textiles and I want this to be my point of difference. I believe the more unique a garment is, the more it will be cherished and hopefully passed down to future generations.

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The conceptual development is based on the life of Marie Antoinette. Since childhood, she was left to a foreign domination where opulence and false joy reigned. The breaks and changes that have marked her life are represented by the combination of curved and straight lines that intersect. Her submissive nature and the hedonistic lifestyle polluted with excess serve as the axis for the development of an organic concept with volumes in the form of helical whirlpools. The fusion of transparencies and the charged natural motifs convey the exuberance and the sensuality that marked the aesthetics of the time. The distortion in blocks is the result of the reintroduction of this aesthetic concept in the 21st century

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What led you to create this amazing brand?":

I wanted to create a high fashion apparel brand that specialized in exceptional quality materials, bold bright colors, patterns, shapes and unique designs.

The Main Collection, which is an active apparel line, focuses on trend fashion with high quality performance materials. I was inspired to create it after seeing a void of color and edginess in the industry. Black is amazing, but bold vibrant colors and prints are showstoppers...a stylish “athleisure” look that can be worn exclusively to the gym or on the street.

The Runway Collection gives way exclusively to the other side of “athleisure.” These are edgy, avant- garde pieces that are not intended for the gym. Unique, innovative, fashion forward designs are created by using distinctive patterns, embellishments, metallics and an array of exceptional materials. Created for my love of couture fashion, style and innovation, with each piece making it's own statement.

"What were you inspired by?”

Designing for me didn't come naturally, nor is it something that I always knew that I wanted to do. As a kid, I was always into fashion and style, sketching faces, sketching dresses, big hair and makeup. Art and fashion were among my first passions and hobbies

My career as a professional model for more than a decade solidified it for me. I started to take it seriously when I wanted to create something unique and totally different from what I had seen before; something that I would wear. Art, color, people, places, and avant-garde designers like Gareth Pugh are all inspirations.

"What is something you would like to tell the other creative artists who aspire to be who you are today?":

The best advice I can give to the “creative” is to be patient and have complete confidence. Be true to yourself and your design esthetically. Lastly, have a clear vision of where you want to be but also know how to accept constructive criticism for growth and learning.

"What does it take to continue growing in this brand?":

To continuously grow, it is necessary to continuously swing with the shifts in the market and adjust accordingly. You must understand customer wants and need and continue to create innovative pieces. Also, there is always the need for marketing to increase your customer base and increase brand awareness.

“What are you most passionate about when it comes to building your empire?”:

What I'm most passionate about when it comes to building an empire, for me, is being at peace, in joy and happiness. Truthfully being in love with creating and expressing myself; and not being pulled in different directions, mentally. It’s important to continue enjoying each moment and feeling the love and gratefulness in it.

See more at www.movesathletix.com,@movesathletix on Instagram, or Moves Athletix on Facebook.

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Guenther Achleitner is an enthusiastic and passionate self-taught freelance photographer from Austria/Europe.

He used to shoot landscape pictures in the 1980’s with an old and tiny analog Minolta X700, but took a two-decade long break from photography to pursue politics. He studied German language and was Vice Mayor of his home city Puchenau. He later walked out of politics in 2012 to intensify his efforts in female beauty photography. Since then, he has been living his dream through his pictures. The brand-name of his enterprise, EIKONAS, is ancient Greek and means "longing for pictures"

Guenther’s portrayal of female beauty is full of respect and appreciation for his models. Beauty cannot be discovered by simply exhibiting objects but by connecting with the subject, with the partner on the other side of the lens. Therefore, his models are always shown as proud and beautiful individuals. His understanding of beauty is based upon his appreciation for genuineness and simplicity, of immediacy and truthfulness of the simple
being as an aesthetic and self-confident individual.
If Guenther’s photographic style has to be defined, a few parameters should be mentioned. In general, he loves colors. Overall, his style can be described as sensual, soft, and natural. Guenther loves to work with the available light, to play with wide open apertures and with lights and shadows as well. Most important to him is staying free in his creative process. He is always learning and trying to develop his skills.

Many people love Guenther’s photography and are interested in learning his way of doing female beauty and nude photography. He provides workshops, masterclasses, and coaching on a regular basis. He has been published in international magazines several times, has been rewarded within several international competitions, and has been showcased in photoart exhibitions in his home country of Austria, but also in Europe. He is ready to travel worldwide to provide his workshops, coaching, and masterclasses and can be booked for commercial activities in the field of photography and picture editing.

Guenther has always known that his passion lies in photography, but it took him some time to finally find his way down the right path. After a brief break where he pursued politics, Guenther finally found his way back to his passion of photography and worked hard to make it his new success story. Today, Guenther is known world-over and his story proves that following one’s dream can be made possible with a mix of commitment and pure passion.

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Compared to designing other garments, designing a suit collection is quite complex. That suit could end up making or breaking a job offer, a promotion, a date, a sale.

It takes high amounts of precision in order to nail the fit, the length, the feel, the fabric, and all the small details that will make a suit the perfect addition to a woman's wardrobe—or something they'll find themselves putting back on the rack.

Evie and Anna is one label that realizes the instrumental effect even the tiniest details can have on a suit's design.

"For us, it has been a very long process. We have worked with suits our entire adult lives and we have become thoroughly obsessed with all the small details. We spend days, even weeks, mulling over the things that other designers tend to overlook. Things like where the tag is placed, how big the internal pocket is sewn, and so on."
They also go into great detail when considering the fabric for each one of their suits. They consider the stretch and whether it's going to keep a woman comfortable at her desk. They consider the lining and whether it's luxurious enough to add to the style while also meeting the marks on durability and comfort.

Evie and Anna test run every single design with friends and family members before declaring that they have come up with the perfect product. Each day, they have worked to separate themselves from the standard suit market, with major focus being placed on exceeding the average quality of the suits being offered today.
"It's one thing to say 'our product is such high quality.' It's another to really mean it. We are so obsessed with high-end fashion that producing a piece that isn’t high end quality is just not acceptable for us."

One thing that helps set the style of Evie and Anna's designs apart from others on the market is that they take a lot of stylistic inspiration from '80s and '90s movies. However, the initial inspiration to start the brand to begin with actually came from their grandma. "She is a woman that has been through so much in her life yet manages to completely make life look so effortless."

Evie and Anna consider they grandma to be their sole inspiration for launching the brand. They call her a "boss lady" and mention that she is the 4-foot-11-inch powerhouse that all their genius designs are run through before any launch. In fact, their grandma is very hands-on with the business. She's the one who makes all of the first samples before designs are sent overseas.

When an outfit becomes your go-to, you know it's good. Evie and Anna strive to design suits that women will run to when all else fails. They strive to make suits that women will want to wear day after day because it always has their back. A suit that makes you feel skinnier, taller, stronger, and more powerful than ever before. Evie and Anna design suits that put women in a mindset where they are ready to conquer the world.

In other words, they set the bar pretty high for their designs. Through designing, testing, and producing suits, they have worked to improve with each rendition. They have recognized that the world's best suits share a few things in common:

"The shoulders fit perfect to make you look sharp, the lapel is peaked and not too slim, the fabric is wool or wool blend, the length is ideal for your specific body type, and the entire ensemble makes you so comfortable when you wear it because the creators behind it really care."
Evie and Anna also shared their description of the ultimate suit for women, stating that the best choice should have a wide peak lapel on top of a double breasted blazer with nothing but a bra underneath and flared trousers to match.

If you want to try out one of their perfect women’s suits for yourself, they will be releasing new British fabrics and suit cuts in the near future. Meanwhile, they are pushing ahead as a breakthrough suit brand aimed at stylish working women. "We want to be the brand that all women run to and remember when its time for a new suit."

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My name is Christine Rochlitz and I established the Berlin-based vegan luxury fashion accessories label LUCKYNELLY in 2012. I have always been very interested in fashion, design, interior, painting, colors, new trends, and creating special and exclusive things. I studied fashion design at the University of Applied Science and Arts in Bielefeld, Germany. After graduating, I worked at a company where I designed children’s clothes for several years. After getting a lot of work experience, I wanted to start my own business as a designer.

I have a wonderful bearded collie dog named Nelly—she was the muse for the brand name. She also inspired my decision to use only cruelty-free and vegan materials and to avoid any kind of animal skin, fur, silk, or wool. With my fashion accessories, I want to show that vegan fashion is very luxurious, unique, and a lasting trend for our future. You have to know that starting a fashion brand is really hard and takes years of non-stop work. As an example, just one challenge was finding a handbag manufacturer because this crafts is nearly extinct. For me, it is an absolute must to have fair trade production.

I found an Italian manufacturer that I am very pleased with because the Italian quality in fashion is the best in the world. I can confidently let this company produce my designs under ethical conditions. High-end quality is essential l for my accessories, but it was also very difficult to find all the awesome and unusual materials that I use today. Things like genuine sewable wood, sewable slate stone, and flexible ceramic—to name a few. I ordered ecological materials from all over the world to find the very best ones. My primary material for my bags and accessories is cork. I am very fascinated by this wonderful, leather-like fabric. In addition, it is 100% recyclable as it is the bark of a tree. It’s also sustainable, water and dust resistant, and it is vegan.

Last year, I made the first vegan luxury handbag made from 80% apples (waste) in the world. This material is the most innovative and ecological material you can find at this time for fashion things, because it is also vegan and recyclable. It feels and looks like leather and can be embossed and colored in any way you desire. Since I always find ecological and fashionable alternatives to genuine animal skins and fur, my design collections are very innovative. All the time, I am choosing different and new materials.

In 2014, LUCKYNELLY won the PETA Vegan Fashion Award in the "Best Accessory for Ladies" category with a wooden belt. Since then, LUCKYNELLY has cooperated very closely with the PETA organization. I have committed to donating 5 euros of every sale to animal welfare groups. As another surprise, after two years of very hard work, the British Vogue contacted me and wanted to present me and my brand as a new talented designer. My unique style also attracted attention and recognition from the British ELLE, Harper's Bazaar, and Cosmopolitan, all of which published me in printed issues.

Now, LUCKYNELLY has been around for six years and is ready for the next step. I found a new business partner, Enrico Ricardo Brückner, and he is one of the new CEO business developers. Enrico Ricardo Brückner is a professional in design engineering and has experience as an IT system salesman. He studied Product Design at the university in Potsdam, Germany and then he worked for several telecommunications companies such as Samsung and Sagem Communications, where he was responsible for new product design and new distribution channels. He was significantly involved in the development of the Porsche Design mobile phone. In 2007, he set up his own business where he branded mobile phones. There, he developed designer phones for various customers such as Aston Martin, Bentley, VW, BMW, Sheikh of Dubai, Universal Music in cooperation with Sony Ericsson, and also smart phones for fashion designers Ed Hardy and Armani. Due to his deep love and solidarity to animals of all kinds and being a proud dog owner, he became an animal rights activists and decided to be full vegan. His girlfriend, Teresa Peitz actively works as a vegan model and animal rights activist, and has done several animal rights fashion shoots with LUCKYNELLY, which were published in printed issues of WELT VEGAN MAGAZINE. We are now very happy to have you and your gorgeous fashion magazine as our partner in the United States.

LUCKYNELLY has experienced some incredible accomplishments since launching in 2012. Based in Berlin, Christine puts all of her focus on designing beautiful and unique accessories using only the finest vegan materials available. Together with her new business partner, Enrico, and professional company model, Teresa, the label is only continuing to grow and they are expected to prosper far into the future.

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Korean sensation RingPocket debuts its jewelry collection in U.K. and Scotland.

Blazing a trail with a large following in the global fashion scene, RingPocket is much loved and endorsed by numerous A-lister fashionistas and influencers. It has graced the cover of most high-end fashion magazines and is loved to be worn at red carpet events. RingPocket is the “IT” fashion jewelry everyone wants to own. 

The brand emphasizes the spirit of originality, creativity, and quality artisanship and the collection reflects the brand’s pulse in two lines. 

RingPocket: The brand offers exquisite handmade fashion jewelry to complete any urban, stylish look. 

RingPocket Sheer: Creating unforgettable beauty for special occasions such as weddings, parties, and the red carpet.

RingPocket has over 10,000 designs registered under the brand. Each piece is exclusively designed and handmade by Korean artisanship, combining surprising and unexpected combinations of materials using exclusive pearls, natural stones, rhinestones, Czech stones, and the finest chains made of either gold-plated brass or white gold. The collection offers must-have pieces for every occasion and the perfect standout accent for special occasions both day and night.

About RingPocket
Founded in 2014, RingPocket is one of the leading global fashion jewelry brands made in Korea, with a renowned reputation for creativity, originality, and Korean artisanship. ‘Ring’ symbolizes handmade jewelry with the heritage of Korean artisanship. ‘Pocket’ emphasizes the importance of remembering and embracing the heritage of artisanship in this modern-day age. 
RingPocket is part of the Lute Works Company, a world leader in fashion accessories and jewelry that owns a portfolio of powerful Korean media brands. 

For as big as they are now, RingPocket started relatively small just like every other success story out there. However, thanks to incredible artisanship and design, the unique brand soon saw adoption from citizen and celebrity alike. It has been propelled forward into a state of global recognition thanks to the unique, quality factors that set the collections apart from the rest. RingPocket’s story just goes to prove that being different is the only way to get beyond-average results.

For more information about RingPocket, visit www.ringpocket.com

Media Contact
RingPocket Public Relations
pr@ringpocket.com  
 

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Windmills have been used since the middle ages. Some time ago, the Netherlands used them to reclaim land from the sea (that’s why our country is called ‘nether’-lands’, which comes from ‘low’, i.e. below sea level). To this day, windmills (including the one portrayed in Four Looks) are used to regulate water levels in the Netherlands. 

For this Fashion editorial, we have used both windmills and a bridge to accommodate the central theme: ‘Wind’. The bridge is linking past and future. In the final images, we have converted the background to black and white as it portrays the past use of the windmills while also showing that their future is uncertain. The outfits shown in this editorial are both classic and modern. The modern looks give us the futuristic style, like a metallic gold jacket mixed with a striped dress, which will be trendy next season. We also see a feather dress from the fabulous Gatsby style (1950's), because fashion never fades. 

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    My love of photography probably passed down to me from my mom back in my childhood. She was fond of all of it, and so in our house, there were many books, pictures and everything related to the photo. Whatever I have done, my true friend, digital camera, was always with me. That is the way photography became my hobby.

    I studied catering trade technology at the University at the pleasure of my parents. After graduating the light came on, I understood that is not my dream to follow. I tried to find myself in different fields, but nothing gave joy! Made my first money I bought my own digital camera and took photo courses for beginners. To learn and be inspired, I regularly took photos of my sister. Of course, she was happy to receive the pictures! She shared these photos on social networks; people started to like it, give good feedback. Finally contacted me and asked to make photo shooting for them. I shot everything: weddings, love stories, children, holidays... Now I am very grateful to my mother for that, for her support, for her belief in me. Her approval has given me the confidence I move in right direction.

    With the rush of clients, it became difficult for me to combine schedule and photography, so I decided to quit my job and let the photography be my career. Reading magazines and exploring the Internet fashion always attracts me, so I began attending various courses of fashion and beauty photography.

    Having little experience, I found like-minded people, make-up artist and hairdresser, and we began to work as a team. We worked with local lifestyle magazines, and new opportunities have opened up. Just then, in 2016, I met Andrey, a guy from Angarsk, who made my life play out in fresh colors. Following him, I moved from Blagoveshchensk in Angarsk, so I had to leave my favorite team and start over. No regret, never look back!

    I live one and half years in Angarsk. Even here, in this very small city, I continue to work as a photographer. I am a regular photographer of the modeling Sigma Scouting agency, I work with the local lifestyle magazine «Rafinad», and I expand my client base. My favorite regular clients make me think I am quite good at it. I believe this is only the beginning! Everything I do today is the result of a great love of my work. I get tones of emotions, meet new people; I am full of energy and enjoy all this. I believe that becoming successful means not to be better than others are, but to be myself slightly better today than yesterday.

    «Top League» photoshoot
    The idea of «Top League» photo shoot leapt in my mind visiting the hockey match of the Ermak team, Angarsk, and the Heilongjiang province, China. My boyfriend knows I like hockey much, so he bought tickets, and this was the first time I watched the game not on TV, but from the grandstand.

    Everyone knows that hockey is one of the most dangerous and violent sports. Male athletes, strong, courageous, in bright and heavy protective equipment, touched my feelings, not to mention the game! It was exciting! However, not only guys play hockey, but some girls too. I wanted to show what a beauty and a hotness these female hockey players have to hide in this armor and protective outfit. The image of a stunning blonde girl in an evening dress and a goalkeeper's helmet appeared in my mind. It happened possibly to make the idea real only when I met Assel, a girl from Chelyabinsk who turned out to be a makeup artist.

     Selenika Makanova, makeup artist
     Professional shooting for me was usual. I work as a model for IStock, Shutterstock, Getty
Images… But to take inside look always attracts me. Just a few makeup courses and now I could not stop... A good team is definitely the key to success! Together with Anna, I gain inspiration from every work we do. 

     One evening Assel invited us to dinner at Dmitry Mikhailov's family, the striker of the very hockey Ermak team. This acquaintance had its effect, and after a couple of days, we got approval to rent the goalkeeper's helmet for our shooting. The same family told me about model Julia. I checked her on Instagram, and she perfectly suited the main role of the «goalkeeper».

     Pyankova Juliya, model
    Julia is a professional model from Magnitogorsk. In 2009, she won the «Super Model of the Russia». In Montenegro, she represented Russia at the world stage and successfully became one of the top five models of the world. Her professional modeling career began. She signed a contract with Ford Models, New York. Julia worked with «Harper's Bazaar», «Level», «Elle Shopping», «Mariage D'or», «Cosmopolitan», «Glamour»... Right after coming back from the USA, Julia met her future husband. Their love grew rapidly and brightly, and Julia began to spend more time with her man rather than make a professional career. After marriage, she follows her husband everywhere. Now he is the defender of Ermak team.

    We arranged a meeting, I did my best to explain a crazy vision of a girl in a chic dress and a helmet, and finally, I got the answer «Why not? »

    The next day I agreed on cooperation with the brand fashion store "Malina Fashion", stylish world brands clothes, footwear, accessories and bags. Playing as a stylist, I chose two elegant dresses suitable for our image. It only remained to find accessories. Larisa Kondratieva, craftswoman from Angarsk, gladly provided gorgeous red earrings with stones for our shooting. As a location background photo studio was chosen.

   We did a great job. The result surpassed all expectations! Well-coordinated teamwork is the key to success. This project received positive feedback from colleagues and friends. And for me, as for other girls, it is the real inspiration that makes me want to grow and develop.

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        I am Korab Kusari, a 31-year-old artist from Gjakova Kosovo. From childhood, I have been a passionate painter and an admirer of renaissance works which have inspired and enriching my enthusiasm for art. It was the emotions expressed in renaissance paintings that drew me to this form of art the most. This interest leads me to pursue the secondary school (high school) of art with a focus on painting. While in secondary school I enjoyed learning all aspects of painting realism works but I began gaining more interest in modern conceptual art. Given the limitations in Kosovo for higher education in art, I felt that pursuing higher education in graphic design and photography gave me the best opportunity to pursue my newfound love for modern conceptual art. 

      The school of photography in Kosovo focusses on the technical aspect of taking a picture and developing them; however, my underlying interest was to learn how to best express emotion through photography. The styles of great photographers such as John Mili with his use of light and shadow to create inspiring portraits, Jimmy Nelson with the expression of human emotion and spirit through the object composition and color game within the portraits, Mario Test's presentation of the models in a unique way, and Fadil Berisha ability to bringing out the utmost beauty on every portrait, have inspired and helped me develop my ability to create the best work I can.

      Today I work as an artistic, fashion, and beauty photographer. I always try to express, through my camera lens, the best emotion of my subject or achieve a work that will inspire the person viewing it. Before every photo session, I consult with my subject, designer, makeup artist to fit the stenograph, light colors, dresses, makeup and poses that are most ideal for the photo-shoot I am trying to achieve.

     My last photo-shoot was called Obsidian, naming it after the beautiful and powerful stone that is meant to “shatter illusions and uncover lies”. And the designer I worked with is known for the unique ways to combine urban and elegant styles to create everyday clothes. My focus for this photo-shoot was, achieve the optimal model positioning for a unique and sensual expression that does not cross into vulgarity, a facial expression that complimented the clothing, and a light/shadow that eliminated illusion and expressed realness of the model and clothing style. In my opinion, the emotional expression, attitude of the model, the power of clothing, the scenography/clothing combination, hair and make-up, composition, light-shadow, and colors could not have been called anything other than Obsidian.

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THE TOUGH KNOCKOUT

    If there’s one advice any model could give in an industry full of judgement, insecurity and lack of regard, it would be to, ‘stay confident’, ‘remain tough’ and have ‘thick skin’.  Although the industry can sound a bit scary, the demands come with rewards: working with renowned photographers, traveling to different countries, and a shot to stardom.  Modeling is not just a profession, it’s a form of art.  That’s how the young and talented Alexis Sheree describes it, “I was never the artistic type, (modeling) is my form of art”.  A model is an artist in every way.  Taking directions and using their natural abilities, models portray so many characters to get the perfect shot.  They either have to channel their inner Bella Hadid to seduce you, Kendall Jenner to fall in love with them or their inner Beyonce for you to bow down the ground they walk on.  But it takes lots of practice in front of a camera.  Models start at a really young age, “I used to model when I was about six years old,” says Alexis who decided to go back after taking a long hiatus to play competitive soccer.  With the support of her family and friends, she was back in front of a camera taking cues like a pro.

    At only nineteen years old, with two years of professional modeling under her belt, Alexis aspires to make it big.  She moved from her hometown in Colorado to the City of Angels to one day becoming an Angel for Victoria’s Secret.  Truth be told, we would all love to have their slender physiques and jaw-dropping attitudes.  Talk about #Goals.  It’s no wonder why Alexis is so driven to make her dreams become reality.  “My biggest inspirations are Tyra Banks and Adriana Lima.  I’d love to shoot with Adriana and collaborate with photographer Russell James,” says Alexis.  We’re already imagining this heavenly collaboration, if it were to happen, our heads would be stuck in the clouds.

    The nineteen year old’s growing experience in her career has brought her to places she can cross off her bucket list.  “I took a job in Peru.  It was an amazing experience to go to South America, it was incredible,” Alexis recalls.  But if modeling does not work out for her, she already has a back up plan, “I have interest in becoming a doctor, I registered for some classes online working towards my degree."  Fingers crossed, we low-key want to see more of Alexis gracing the covers of magazines with her doctorates.  Because everyone loves a beauty with brains, it’s the total package!

It was a bright sunny day in L.A., perfect weather for a photoshoot when Alexis, shot with our Editor-In-Chief/Photographer, Alarick McGlory.  Capturing Alexis in amazing light and all the right angles, she shares with us her experience, “He made me feel so comfortable and communicated with me in a constructive and positive way, which produced such great shots”.  The pictures are beautifully shot and Alexis made modeling look like a piece of cake.  If only we could all have her confidence, “You have to always be yourself and own it, try not to let what people think of you tear you down,” she says.  We’ll keep this in mind if we ever decide to get behind the lens and strike a pose.

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THE GENTLE ARTIST

          Watching a ballerina dance is like running your fingers through pure silk for the first time, watching a feather fall slowly onto the ground, and tasting the savory decadence of chocolate mousse on your tongue.  The most elegant dancers of the art are passionate and dedicated to their work.  Each stride, stroke, and flicker of their moves will hypnotize you and leave you yearning for more. Their mysterious unspoken demeanor is somber, yet confident, sultry, and sexy with a bit of coyness.  Each ballerina portrays a story using their bodies as instruments to tell tales that can only be spoken through dance and songs.  Words are not needed for their technique of storytelling.  It’s all in their feet, hands, bodies, and faces full of emotion.

            Saori Yamashita is a professional ballerina from Sapporo, Japan who moved to Santa Barbara, California to continue her passion.  Her first encounter with the elegant art started when she was only six years old, after seeing a Japanese comedian impersonating a ballerina.  All laughs aside, Saori was amused by the sitcom but was completely captivated.  From then, she was convinced she wanted to become one.  One of her earliest moments of happiness was when she received her first pair of pointed ballet shoes.  After putting them on, Saori transformed into a raging confident dancer and was spinning, bowing, and gliding like there was no tomorrow.  Feeling overjoyed, she felt unstoppable. 

            Ballet takes a lot of discipline, determination, and guidance.  One of her favorite instructors was from Japan, Shinobu Takita Sensei, “She is such an amazing teacher who taught me so much in such a short amount of time.  Shinobu Sensei taught me how to behave like a ballerina,” Saori explains.  Saori tells us that ballet lies in the grey areas of athleticism and artistic abilities but should not be mistaken as a sport.  “Ballerinas can be competitive with each other, but it’s natural.  The purpose of ballets is not just the classical component but it is that of storytelling,” she tells us.  “We invite the audience into our world filled with enchantment and fantasy,” Saori says.  We have to agree, watching ballerinas dance is quite the magical experience.  There’s a sense of whimsical wonder that captivates your attention and pulls at your heartstrings. 

            Traveling is by far one of the best perks of being a ballerina. “Not only do you get to visit all these wonderful places, but meet so many interesting people from all of the world!”, Saori explains.  But in order to reap the rewards, hard work must be put in.  Ballerinas search for perfection in their art.  “We spend a lot of time judging ourselves and learning to trust our own instincts,” she says.  Like any full time job, Saori works five days out of the week and puts in overtime if she has to.  Especially when she has an upcoming performance, Saori has to make sure everything is perfect. There was a time Saori was sick but couldn't let that stop her.  She went on stage, looking like a million dollars, as elegant as ever, with a smile on her face, and performed like she wasn’t about to faint.  "I don’t know why I did that, never again…,” Saori recalls.  This woman needs a standing ovation for her courageous sacrifice.

            If Saori was not a professional ballerina she would be a dog trainer and would continue practicing playing the piano.  Thank goodness she's a ballerina because she's quite the show stopper on stage.  “When I’m on stage, I feel unstoppable, it’s the most amazing feeling ever,” she explains.  We can only imagine how Saori feels because we can’t even stand on our toes for two seconds, let alone the two hour performances she has to go through, we’d be dead. Ballerinas are not just artists but they’re a walking piece of art themselves.  They’re the most captivating creatures of storytelling.      

The Illustrious Maverick
Introduction by Joan Awa
    
    They stare at you, with their eyes
piercing yours in swirls of color and haze.  They’re calm, collective but a splatter of chaos.  You don’t know if you’re sober or tripping out on a hallucinogen.  Or it could just be that extra shot of espresso in your latte. Looking into a Ben Silberstein piece alters your state of mind and brings you to a world of the surreal. Engulf
yourself in the pages of his work and see if you can find your light at the end of the tunnel. Because that’s exactly what Silberstein found when he took his art to the next level.

You caught our eye on Instagram, how did it feel when we reached out to you?

The short answer is: it felt amazing, but I
reflexively tried not to get my hopes up at first, almost waiting for the other shoe to drop. But to think that I would get an opportunity of this kind in the world of fashion...it renders me
speechless. My sophomore year of college, I alternated between a few different pairs of sweatpants. I didn’t have any fashion sense. But I started taking an interest in fashion before my junior year of college and am pretty thrilled to see something like this happen in my life. I am eternally grateful. It’s really cool. It’s a pleasant surprise to say the least.

Have you ever been featured or has your work ever been published?

My work has never been published before, so this is a first for me. It was probably the best news I’ve gotten in my life, to be honest (when I knew it was official that this was happening), so thanks. I have been lucky enough to be featured, however, in four shows this year, all in the LA area. It has been an exciting year getting some
exposure. The
experiences were all pretty surreal. Two of them were just exhibits, so I got to hang out from a
distance and watch people look at my framed prints and stretched canvas prints. That was strange and poignant. At the other two, I had to meet lots of new people and there was some level of pressure to sell things, so they were more difficult.

Can you tell us more about yourself, we want to know the artist behind the work. Where are you from?

I was born and raised in New York City, right in Manhattan. I think I owe a lot to that city. It’s full of ambitious and competitive people, and in a social sense, I got chewed up and spit out a bunch of times as a kid. I was really naive and I guess luckily I learned all about human nature and human behavior. I changed schools twice in three years around high school, so I didn't have too many friends. I always felt that there were social machinations that I didn’t understand. I became accustomed to feeling like that and trying to find a type of solidarity with myself while alone. I knew that on Friday nights kids were going to parties that I obviously wasn’t invited to. I just tried not to think about it. I wasn’t very confident so it was difficult to go into school and try to hold my head up and act like I didn’t feel like a lesser human. I felt overlooked in every way (socially, academically, athletically, artistically, etc), almost like I was the most forgettable person ever. In college I figured some important things out creatively and personally and got it in my head that I belonged on the west coast. I moved to LA in 2015 and have been trying to figure things out since then.

How long have you been creating art?

When I was a kid, drawing was my favorite thing to do. I had no interest in interacting with anyone, I just wanted to draw. My parents told me a story about how the teachers in my pre-K class took away my chair at the drawing table as a way to discourage me, so as to force me to interact with other kids. But I just drew standing up, so then they took the markers away from me altogether. I had a few other negative
experiences like that in school that realistically
delayed and halted my creative growth and I
pretty much didn’t draw at all in middle school or high school. I resented art for a while. I didn’t pick up drawing again until late in college, after I had gone through some fairly serious mental health issues. I found it therapeutic and a beautiful emotional outlet. 

It was my older self connecting with my younger self and finding that solidarity. It changed my life. I never looked back after that.

You have a really different & interesting style to your artwork. Can you describe your style?

Thank you. I don’t really like describing my style, if I am being honest. My goal is just to communicate emotions in the realest and most honest way that I can. But I think the beauty of art and of
communication is that anyone can interpret
anything however they’d like. When someone looks at something I made, all I hope is that they are
feeling something, anything really. I don’t care if they relate to me perfectly, or if the emotions they feel are even close to mine. I just want them to know it’s real and I want them to be stirred in some way.

What makes you stick out from the other artist?

I think that most artists are really full of themselves. It shouldn’t bother me so much, but it does. I am definitely not full of myself, and I am proud of that. All I’m doing is what feels right and expressing myself accordingly. It doesn’t have to be more complicated than that. I think lots of artists really believe that they are gods of some kind, and that their art is a divine message. In reality, any person can express themselves. I believe that wholeheartedly. Nobody needs any kind of special training to doodle/draw/ 

whatever and let their mind wander. Expressing oneself and creating art is inherently a good thing for the individual, but to think that it somehow makes an individual more “exceptional” than someone else is, in my
opinion, self-indulgent. I think there is a balance between being proud of oneself and staying grounded, and I’ve been trying to find that balance as long as I’ve been alive. No matter what happens in my life, I don’t expect my attitude to change. I embrace the truth of what I’m doing on a personal level, but that’s as far as it will ever go. There’s nothing special about me.

Can you tell us what ‘Bribe Nestle Sin’ means?

Bribe nestle sin is just an anagram of my real name, Ben Silberstein. My junior year of college, when I was really getting going creatively, I made a website for myself (www.bribenestlesin.com). I wanted to separate my name from the art. It was a way to insulate the art from my fragile ego at the time. I also felt that it would be easier for people to remember those three words than my real name. The name itself came from a word unscrambler and I picked it out of a list. It doesn’t have to have deeper meaning, but it can apply to human nature if you want it to.

You have some interesting titles for your pieces, can you tell us how you come up with the titles?

I come up with the title after I finish whatever I’m working on. Occasionally, I’ll have something in mind as I’m going. There are lots of ways to express something, words being one method. There are some really great words that can do an excellent job of conveying real meaning, but this is definitely not always the case. Words can only go so far and sometimes the emotions aren’t explainable at all, so there might be a real disconnect between any title and what someone might think of when they look at something I made. That’s cool with me. That disconnect becomes part of the art. I fall somewhere amongst ‘titles are unnecessary,’ ‘maybe something is better than nothing,’ and ‘some word or combination(s) of words can possibly be elegant here.’

What inspires/influences you to create your pieces?

I like to think about people in my past who didn’t treat me the right way, or how I think I deserved to be
treated. That usually gives me energy to get going, even if it’s inherently negative. But honestly it’s a lot of what I’m feeling at the time. I am always trying to sprinkle my
perspective into everything I do artistically. I want there to be some confusion and ambiguity because that’s always there existentially for me. I like lines and
silhouettes so I focus on creating one that I think looks nice and then after that, I want to add ambient colors and effects for an emotional collage. Sometimes I overlay a photo over a silhouette as a way of showing what’s inside the subject emotionally. Sometimes the subject looks really confident. That’s intentional. It means that I’m feeling good about what I’m doing because I know what 

I’m doing is right. It’s a message to the people who decided to oppose me or change teams on me: don’t need you, I never did. See? ther times the
subject appears to be going through crisis, which is also intentional. Conveying the vulnerability is
important because no one is immune. It depends on the day. Existence is a strange beast like that.

Do you have a favorite artist? Who and why?

It really depends on the medium, but I would say my favorite artists all make music, specifically hip-hop. eflection Eternal y Hi-Tek & Talib Kweli was
probably the record that sparked my love for the genre. The group Outkast taught me a lot about embracing strangeness in style, being different, real, and not caring what anyone has to say about it. I can remember rocking out by myself at school dances to “Ms. Jackson” and “So Fresh, So Clean” (even if I didn’t understand the lyrical content at the time). 
Hip-hop has changed a lot, but I still love it. The overlap of fashion and hip-hop is something that has always intrigued me, and it’s taken off in recent years with artists like ASAP Rocky, et al. It kinds of feels personally like it has been a parallel development. It is very much a significant goal of mine to collaborate with hip-hop artists in some way, whether musically, in fashion, visual art, anything really.

Do you have your own studio, where do you create your artwork?

My apartment is my studio where I do probably 95% of my Photoshop work, but I will occasionally go to cafes as well. I try to draw in different places though, since it’s easier for me to be flexible with. I like drawing with friends a lot, so I do my best to mix it into my life. I think there is creativity by osmosis, so to speak, and new ideas are routinely harvested during shared artistic/drawing
, whether coloring, doodling, portraits, etc.

How long does it take you to complete/finish a piece?

It usually takes me at least a couple of hours to
finish what I’m working on. There are days where I’m really productive and can finish 5-10, but then there are other days where it feels like a grind. It also depends on how high my standards are at the time. If I’m being more minimal, it can take 30 minutes for me to finish an image. But if I am really agonizing over the smaller details, it could span over multiple days. It really depends, honestly.

Do you sell your artwork or is it more for personal use?

Both. But I never start anything with the idea that I’m going to sell it. I have been lucky to have some level of demand from people who saw me at a show, but a number of people have reached out through Instagram to make inquiries about purchasing a print or two, or a commission, which is really 

awesome. I have 7 “originals,” which I brought to shows to display and potentially sell, and I would happily still sell them. I’m still figuring out the game. It’s difficult.

Is this your only profession, did you go to school or study art or was this something that just came naturally? Is it a hobby?

I used to be a real estate appraiser, which I still chuckle about, but as of now this is my only profession. It is more than a hobby for me for sure at this point, but I try to keep an open mind about what I could be doing in the future. I did not go to school for this, nor did I ever study art (minus two drawing classes my senior spring of college). This was something that I started doing more and more of during my life because it felt right, and through school, travel, moving, work, etc.; I kept doing it because it was a
necessary outlet as a constant through change. It will always be there for me in life no matter what I do, whether it is my whole life or just a hobby. One way or another, It’s mandatory in my mind.

What form of medium do you use for your
artwork?

I use Photoshop primarily, but I also love to draw with markers, especially brush-tip markers because of their
incredible versatility. Pen is alright too, but not as fun. I’ve tried painting a few times in my past and it didn’t come naturally to me, or at least I didn’t feel the confidence or control over it that I did with marker or pen. I love to write and one of my life goals is to write a novel, maybe a graphic novel. I used to write some poetry when I was younger. Photography will always play a role too.

Finally, what can we see Ben Silberstein doing on the weekend besides creating art? Tell us some of your other interests aside from art.

My favorite hobbies are fantasy baseball and chess. My time is largely spent on art, researching/analyzing
baseball statistics, and doing chess tactics
puzzles/playing games of chess and that’s something I’m cool with obviously. LA is a cool city too. I find things to do here.

 

The Beauty from Brooklyn
    Do you remember your freshman year in college when you didn’t know what to do in your life and you check the box ‘undeclared’ in your application for enrollment? You just graduated from high school, was pressured to go to school
because it feels like the right thing to do after senior year. All your friends are doing it, so why not? Then, four years past and you end up with a degree you didn’t even want or need. Story of our lives. But
something happens, in your early
adulthood, you figure out you can turn your natural skills into an actual profession.  
Graduating three years ago with a degree that has nothing to do with her profession in art and photography, Erica Genece took a shot at practicing lighting with self
portraits and figured she actually had a knack for it

Erica’s skill and passion for photography runs through her veins.  Her entire family is just as talented, “My family was always taking photos or video taping the kids, it’s something I became a fan of early on” she shares with us. She tells us her earlier years, her dad owned a
camera from the 1960s, which the family still has to this day. And, as a teenager how the polaroid was the ultimate go-to camera for selfies back in the day.  Photography has evolved so much through the years, from flash to shaking polaroid pictures, to now, digital photography, making it accessible for everyone to see, 
everywhere. This, is how we stumbled upon Erica. Her portraits on Instagram caught our eye and we were curious to see more of this woman’s work!  She started taking portraits to practice her
lighting, with no models to work with, she became creative and practiced on herself.  “Being in front of the camera can be intimidating! But, it helps me to connect with how it feels to be photographed,” she explains.  Now, Erica has no problem finding
models, she became an independent photographer and gets commissioned to take photos and has been featured in Estela Magazine and Ellements
Institute.

Besides photography, Erica also gets behind the lens and models, “Being the model is alot of fun, you can bring different sides of your personality and become different characters”, she says. But, the true artist in her chooses one side over the other, “...I still prefer being the creator of the 

images, the woman behind the art. 
I like to be the one photographing beauty”.  
Beauty is always going to be in the eyes of the
beholder and Erica captures universal
beauty, which captivates an array of audiences.  “Beauty is what make you, YOU.  The
interesting quirks, the gaps in the teeth, the freckles on the nose, your big lips, all of that mixed with the most important part, your
personality and confidence...no one else can
replicate!” she perfectly explains. This is why her photos are picture perfect! We can’t stop crying inside over this comment. Erica has us gushing and our smiles are from ear to ear. She just made us feel like the most beautiful person in the world. If we could only insert a million crying faces and huge grin emojis in this…

Most photographers are globe trotters, always
getting called for duty to shoot in different
destinations. Where is Erica’s next stop? L.A. The city of Angels is calling her to wade in the sandy beaches and bask in the hot sun, 
kissing her skin before before the summer ends. We wish we could join Erica so we can get a glimpse of how she works but we’ll just catch up with her travels and whereabouts on Instagram. She hikes, snowboards, is totally into food, plays the violin and is starting her own jewelry line, MonArt Jewelry. We can’t wait to see what she’ll be posting next! 

      In the capital of the Chuvash Republic, the fashion event of Global Fashion Night, the general partner of Mercedes Benz Fashion was held.  It aimed of developing the fashion industry in the region.  From Moscow to Cheboksary arrived Russian designer YuliyaMorozova, with his new collection "Generation alpha" from fashion brand AkellaBo. The collection of the famous Moscow designer is inspiration drawn fromhis visit of hundreds of interactive scenes of Cheboksari.  The event gathered well-known personalities of the city, as well as people who are involved in the fashion industry- stylists, designers, bloggers and just people who love fashion. The event of such level was held in
Cheboksary for the first time; which aroused a keen interest and resonance.  The heart of the brand is a combination of beauty and comfort, bold prints of their own design, intriguing shape, and a bit of madness in every way. "Dressed up and went" is what the designer explains as, “When you wearAkellaBo, you remain to look wonderful and impress people.”  This clothing is designed for the daring, young, courageous, active people leading an active lifestyle and love to shock. In the words of AkellaBo, ‘It's Time To Show Who You Are’. 

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    Have you ever met a man who needs no introduction because his photos speak for themselves? Each time you see an Alex
Rosenkreuz photo, you know the artist behind the piece. He is that man.  Known for capturing the beauty of each person through his lens, Alex is unstoppable with commercial, personal and private work. Let’s just say, you can never come across a bad photo. It’s just impossible, unspeakable. But, this is exactly what Alex says with his latest collaboration with Paula Guillo, the breathtaking Miss Universe
contestant from Spain. “Paula is
absolutely amazing, working with her is a blast. We’re here at the beach in Laguna. The look and the vibe is just great.”  We are able to go behind the scenes and watch carefully how Alex works; as the sun beams its rays over our
model and how he carefully captures
perfection with precision.

It’s hard to believe the former office worker has only been taking pictures for two years because his photos scream decades worth of experience and his clients are at the peak of the mountains in the fashion industry.  For some, actually most, this is a hard climb to the summit but Alex soared with just his camera in hand. “It was a pretty good indication that I was going to pursue my photography as soon as I quit my full time job,” he explains.  Alex had clients lining up and it wasn’t hard for him to attain more. His list kept getting longer and longer.  “I knew when I made my transition, it was the right choice,” he says.  

Within just two months after purchasing his first professional camera, Elite Model Management reached out to Alex and asked him to start
immediately. “I started shooting their models and everything just took off from there,” he tells us.  Once his rocket left the landing pad and shot off into space, it never came back down. Alex’s career is continuously travelling through time and space and hasn’t slowed down since then.  Gravity hasn’t affected him either, “I’ve been very blessed, I don’t really pay attention to my own hardships, I tend to focus on all the positive and amazing things that surround me,” he says.  

Alex’s positive outlook on life by fulfilling his dreams has led him to land so many gigs
internationally. “Most of my clients come to me.  

I’ve had people fly in from Canada, Europe, 
different parts of the U.S. because they are looking for my particular aesthetic” he tells us.  With a wise head above his strong shoulders, Alex knows exactly what to do when he’s
working. “I describe my work as ‘timeless
moments in fashion’; and maybe one day, I would love to work with timeless models as well like, Kate Moss and Linda Evangelista,” he admits.  What advice has one of the most sought after
photographers have for newbies?  “Don’t try to be someone you are not.  Strive to be the best version of yourself. It’s the whole process of growth,” he says with a snap of his button while he continues to take photos of the gorgeous
Paula.

Interview by Joan Awa

Bikini Blogger Babe
    
    Just imagine a sun kissed, golden gal rising from Sydney’s waters, flipping her hair back as she comes up from her swim.  The
water from her hair is dripping down her shoulders, sliding down her body, making its way back into the ocean. She stares at you with her glistening eyes and reties her undone strings.  The babe in the itty bitty bikini is
Alexandra Lissing, a.k.a. Allie.  The former competitive gymnast started her modeling career by accident. A friend of hers who was starting a new bikini line needed photos for
advertising and was pleased to see how the pics of Allie turned out, immediately
proclaiming her the face of the brand.

Allie is used to being in front of the camera, she is ½ of a dynamic duo with her husband, a director and photographer.  They have been working together for five years, Allie is the producer and stylist for his commercial work and the couple creates content for companies through film and photography.  Their personal projects such as her blog, ‘I Dream of Bikini’ is a visual journal in which the two can freely express themselves.  The blog they started two years ago shows their creative work as a couple but also highlights other bikini brands that have been floating around or those that are just surfacing from the shadows.

Allie’s most recent collaboration features French brand, Carla Bikini on her blog.  “They have a feminine, sexy style that works for all body shapes and sizes and they’re made with comfort in mind and there’s coverage in all the right places!”, she says. Speaking of all shapes and sizes, Allie who is a former athlete maintains a fit frame.  For those who lack confidence thinking they can never get themselves into a bikini so easily as she can, she gives us some of her confidence boosting tips, “The lack of confidence comes from the perception that we will be judged, no matter what your size is, you are beautiful and no one can define that beauty except for you. Confidence is a form of self love, no matter what it is, intellectual, physical or performance based.”  

If those motivational and inspirational words are still not working for you, Allie has a few more words to say, “As women, we need to support each other, love each other and always follow the code: we should never shame anyone for any reason.  Everyone has their own battles they are silently fighting.”  We can’t help but agree! In a time where social media influences the minds to think a certain image is more ideal than others, we have to be ready to counter these perceptions to look at everyone as a work of art. We are all natural beauties, in our own unique and special way.

What’s next for this motivational mermaid? “I am in the process of designing my own swimwear line and hoping to release in 2018,” Allie says with her bubbly attitude and pearly white grin.  Her glowing features outshine the sun and we can feel the warmth just by talking to her.  “We also have an upcoming shoot, an all white bikini editorial featuring brands like, Bianca Coletti and Zimmerman and fashion pieces from Alex and Ani,” she explains while we low-key melt inside from excitement because we can’t wait to see the next editorial!  

Every issue I set out to do something different.  I continue to find ways to grow and evolve in different directions.  I’m always continuously looking at various inspirational artists and it's amazing!  I combine all the things that I am inspired by before creating an issue.  This issue is very special to me, it was my first issue in which I developed over 600 pages and captured the cover myself.  I truly felt victorious when I realized the moment that I was able to achieve my goal. This latest issue started with a great collaboration with Alex; he contacted me and told me he was working on a project.  I'm always excited to find out what Alex Rosenkreuz is working on.  He had this brilliant model that he was very excited to collaborate with and asked me if I was available to style for the project.  It has been awhile since I have had the pleasure of working with him so I said,“Yes!”, but I would have never thought in a million years that this would be the shoot that I would have gotten inspired by; I was able to capture the amazing Miss Universe of Spain on the cover of McGlory Fashion Magazine.  She had an amazing personality,she was down-to-earth and had a wonderful sense of humor.  It's always great collaborating with different models and photographers from around the world, you learn so much about artists from different countries.  After spending time with Paola and learning about all of her accom-plishments and her journey as a growing artist, I started to realize something: every contributing artist that we have ever featured in our issues all started with a vision.  An-yone with a dream starts off with a vision.  This is when the hard work and the journey begins…this is when you have a sense of direction, purpose and something that you want to achieve.  Being in the Fashion World and emerging as a stylist while working for different companies, you learn so much in such a short amount of time.  I started off in 2012 with Paul Kang fashion photography, I was the head stylist of his company.  After working with him for some time, I left and went to Nayeli Art.  From there, I interned for a magazine for a year.  Then, in 2015 I launched McGlory Fashion Magazine. The following year, in 2016 I launched MFM Boudoir Diaries.  I just kept going, there was nothing holding me back or stopping me.  My vision was taking me places I not only dreamed of going but where I was destined to be.  Everything was so transparent, it became clear to me that this is where I am supposed to be.  What people didn't know was that I  have been practicing photography under the radar.  I made this my next adventure.  I have always admired and truly respected photographers on how they capture a moment and making it last forever, freezing time in digital

form.  Anyone can freeze time, with cell phones and many other devices but it's different when it came to photography.  It was my time to show people what I saw when time froze.   In the fashion industry there's something about a team that comes together; you have a production assistant,a
lighting technician,the makeup artist, hair stylist, wardrobe stylist and art directors.  It takes a team to make a dream and you need every last one of these components to make a successful editorial.  

The collaborative ideas come together to create a history in the making; moments that no one can ever take from you and that will be here long even after we have passed.  I truly feel like the work that we do today as growing artists,as #dreamchasers and #entrepreneurs will inspire the next generation of growing artists. 

I named this issue the ‘Visionary Issue’ because it truly started with a vision and a dream: to spotlight all the amazing, growing artists throughout the entire world as we evolve as a growing brand.  In Volume 2, I will take you behind the lens and you can get a glimpse with BTS photos that I took along this journey of putting this editorial together.  Throughout each volume,you will see the opening image imprinted with Paola, Miss Universe of Spain’s signature which I have personally captured myself.For each issue I also want to give special thanks from the amazing artists that I was influenced and inspired by, Alex Rosenkreuz and Danielle Yu.  To my team, Debarati Mohanta, Sky Braun and Joan Awa, thank you for being a tremendous part of this journey.  Every single one of you are destined for greatness and it's been a pleasure collaborating with all of you throughout the years.  Last but not least, to my number one fan, my mother, Deborah, I could not have done it without you.


Signing off,
Alarick McGlory, Editor In Chief
McGlory Fashion Magazine: Let’s DISCOVER CREATIVITY.
(Instagram: @McGlory_FashionMagazine)

Our contributors never fail to amaze us and we are taken aback by one of our latest submissions from photographer, Matthew John Carr.  Everything was perfection; the angles, the lighting, the styling, the expressions...everything! We just had to shine a light on his amazing talent!

Matt Carr, is from a small town in the U.K. but his talent developed in the island of Barbados.  When we think of Barbados, Rihanna comes into mind. And, from the looks of his editorial in this issue, it’s very Rihanna: it’s groundbreaking, edgy, fearless and in your face. It’s badass, with so much class.  “I never had the desire to take up photography...my family opened a clothing store in Barbados and I thought it would look more professional..by taking photos myself…,” Carr explains.  Let’s just say it was his natural instincts and hidden talent that eventually got him to where he is today.  Even if Matt thinks it’s a bit of luck that got him the gigs, we beg to differ; his photos started gaining attention of modeling agencies, which led him to go back home to the U.K. and develop from there.

What’s his lethal weapon of choice?  A Canon 5D and a 7D as backup, just in case he can’t get what he wants. The man is skilled at his trade, what can we say?  “Cameras are highly essential to taking really great pictures, are they not?”, asks Carr.  Um...yes Sir, no questions asked, we totally agree with you! If you want to look like your business should be everyone else’s your photos have to be spot on.  With every craftsman of his trade, there’s always an object of desire that’s attainable but can be way out of reach.  “I would love to own a Hasselblad camera in my kit,” says Carr. This weapon of mass destruction can cost up to $9,000 or about 8,000 euros where Matt is from.  Don’t worry Matt, just a few more shoots and we can feel it in our bones you’ll be owning one in no time.

While others struggle to figure out how they really want to be good at something so bad, Matt was the total opposite of that.  Taking photos was a no-brainer. “It was more of fine tuning...so it looked like a fashion image, making every element work,” he says.  When you look at Carr’s photos, you can tell the amount of work put in, the attention to details and everyone who is involved in the photo.  “Makeup artists, directors, models and post productions...there’s a lot involved in an image,” Matt explains. 

We ask Matt if he had a favorite photographer, 

 “Mario Testino...the most inspirational photographer...his images are effortless,”.  Peruvian Testino is one of the most renowned artists of his time, taking mainly portrait-like photos for the big names in fashion magazines like, Vogue, Vanity Fair and GQ which we think Matt should be featured in sooner or later!  If there was one model he would love to take photos of it would be the bombshell, Joan Smalls, “...I think she’s an amazing model and I would also love to work with your editor and stylist, Alarick,” he says.  I think we just planned ourselves a photoshoot. It’s already written in our bucket list!

The feeling of getting published is almost indescribable, it’s uplifting, it’s refreshing, it’s like getting rained on by heaven’s tears!  “It’s a great feeling to see your images beautifully presented when published.  It really brings the story to life
it gives you a great sense of achievement and allows you a platform to show your
work off and see it be a part of something,” we cannot agree enough with Matt’s humbling words. We’re just more at awe with his wisdom, we lean in to listen and Grease’s ‘Summer Nights’ plays in the back of our heads (‘tell me more, tell me more’), “...I get a proud feeling especially if you and your team have researched, planned, a photoshoot from scratch to finish...you see the final product and pull everything off,” Carr explains.

Before every success is the struggle.  How does one go on? We ask Matt and he says, “I’ve had moments where I felt like i’ve leveled out or that there’s no interest...but I have to search for an idea or look at things in a different angle and take the risk.”  What really drives him is the ever evolving fast-paced lifestyle of fashion.  There’s always high energy and passion that gives Matt new and refreshing ideas which keeps him going and going.  “I have my own vision and how I want everything to look, that’s what makes me unique..” he says about his style.  Those who work with Matt have to run on the same tracks, his mind travels at 100mph and he won’t stop for anyone.  His team always has to be ready when he wants to switch gears, change his tire and re-fuel when he’s slowing down.

We wonder if Barbados is calling Matt back for the summer?  “There are so many places I would love to...maybe Hong Kong or Japan, so I can experience a different culture.”  Ok, maybe not. But either country is remarkable! With his Canon 5D in hand, we can imagine he’ll be taking photos of everything and anything! Matt tells us of his future work, “I’ve been working on fibre optic lighting, studying movement and energy, how to capture it...so there’s a lot more to come, keep your eyes peeled.”  Trust us, we will.
 

This editorial was born by a chance meeting through social media. The Olson’s, fans of designer Sherry E. Combs work, approached her about collaboration. Combs quickly agreed that she and sixteen-year-old model Sydney Olson would make a great team. Once the designs and styling ideas were born, then came the task of finding fellow creatives to bring the set to life.  Photographer Jeni Harter from Pieces of Life Photography was brought on board, as again, the Olson’s were “long blown away by her wonderful and creative portraiture.” Makeup artist Jordan Patterson was called upon next to offer her creative talents. The headpiece pictured upon Sydney’s head actually required bringing in set assistant, Jamie Russell, as it weighed seven pounds and reached a height of nearly two feet. Fusing several of our categories together, like those of fashion and beauty, we finally decided to feature “Concrete Jungle” here in the art section. Check out the team members further on their Instagram accounts.


PHOTOGRAPHER: JENI HARTER @photographypiecesoflife
MODEL: SYDNEY OLSON @olson_syd
DESIGNER: SHERRY E. COMBS @twt_design_wear
HAIR/MUA: JORDAN PATTERSON @jordan_skyy13
SHOOT COORDINATOR: ANGIE OLSON @angierolson
SET ASSISTANT: JAMIE RUSSELL

On any given day in Toulouse, France, or perhaps even further north in Paris, you may have the pleasure of happening upon one of Patrick Roux’s, renowned international fashion photographer, shoots. Roux took his first fashion photographs about thirty years ago. While he travels the globe now for work, he still shoots regularly in and around his hometown of Toulouse.

One of his favorite muses, Anne Claire, featured in these images, has been collaborating with Roux’s trusted eye for almost half a decade now – since 2013. They have worked together numerous times, all of which have been great experiences. “Anne Claire is an amazing model,” said Roux, as he explained how she is able to successfully adapt to the character of each shoot. More importantly, Roux added that Anne Claire is also just a “very nice person” in general and therefore, always a pleasure to creatively collaborate with.

In the first featured editorial of Roux’s, Anne Claire is photographed solo. The purpose of this shoot was to “work in a different way,” explained Roux, though upon learning even a little about the French fashion photographer, it’s clear he strives to shoot each new editorial in a different way from the last. He has somehow found a balance between classic sophistication and innovation.

At the time of this first editorial, Roux was especially inspired by images taken by the one-and-only Helmut Newton. The product was, for all of you to see here, a delicate, feminine take on an otherwise masculine theme and style. Upon seeing Anne Claire play this role so well, a larger idea was born in Roux’s mind. And it did not take long to execute.

A few weeks later, the second featured editorial was organized and executed. However, it is worth mentioning that Roux shared how challenging it can be organizing such a shoot. “You have to manage a whole team, [consisting of] makeup artist(s), hair stylist(s), model(s),” as Roux went on to further emphasize how every detail needs to be ideal for everyone, especially for the model. Though for Roux, there must simply be good ambiance, as it is “one of the keys to a successful shoot and great pictures.”

Brought on board for this next collaboration was another model named Fanny. Roux worked with her before, as well. He said, “Fanny is a very different model and a very good friend of Anne Claire, [which] was evident doing this duo shoot with them.” Their personal relationship only served the creative process well though, as their comfortability levels with one another amplified the images captured by Roux.

“I wanted to build a story about what could happen in the life of a couple, using one model in a man’s role and the other one in a woman’s role,” said Roux. He decided that Anne Claire would play the masculine role, as he was sure she could deliver, especially based on the results of their previously androgynous shoot together. Fanny, then, took on the female role. 
Roux is constantly taking pictures everywhere he goes. He has travelled all around the world, but desires to travel to more “unusual places” where he hopes to capture some great images. Last year, he was on the west coast of the United States shooting several editorials, which “was a wonderful
experience [getting to shoot] in wild landscapes with wonderful lights.” The year before that, Roux was in Japan, which became a place he holds near and dear to his heart.

On one of his first-ever shoots, Roux described producing very colorful
images against a beautifully blue sky. “I remember [this] was a long time ago when I did swimsuit pictures by the beach. [We were] in the water against big rocks in the Atlantic Ocean near Biarritz,” he said.

Having tackled every big city in Europe and the United States, Roux is
headed to South Africa this summer. After that, he plans to travel to Brazil, chasing after the joy that fashion photography truly brings him. For any
individuals who strive to work in the fashion industry, specifically as a
photographer, Roux offered a few words of advice: “Be yourself. Do not try to copy [others] – trust yourself. And always take pleasure.”

SB: How were the concepts of the photo shoots featured in this issue born? Describe the creative process for us.

JL: Actually, this set of photos is probably one of my favorites so far. I went with a small group of models to New York City for a week, [where we were] shooting every day, all day. We went out [each day, donning pre-] selected outfits based on the location, and the rest of it just came together. Feeling out the vibe and energy and working as a team [is how] the magic just starts to happen right before your eyes.

SB: How did you and photographer MikoKlubz meet and start working together

JL: A friend of mine told me about Miko. She had me friend him on
Facebook and follow all [of] his work. One day Miko posted about doing a group party shoot for aspiring models he never worked with, so I messaged him about coming out for that and worked with him ever since. Social media has been a great tool for me to meet new photographers and other people in the industry.

SB: Are you signed with any agencies?

JL: No, as of right now, I am not signed with any agency.

SB: Where are you from and where do you reside now?

JL: I’m from a small town outside of Toledo, Ohio and still live around the same area as of right now. I foresee myself living by a beach or mountains [with an incredible] view some day soon, haha.

SB: When did you begin modeling? What was your first gig?

JL: Only about two years now. I am [also] a hairstylist, and one day a client who is
a wedding photographer asked me if I would be her model for a class she was going to. Ever since then I have been modeling when I'm not working behind the chair.

SB: Have you traveled anywhere for any of your gigs? If so, where? 
JL: So far I have traveled to New York City, [as well as] all around Michigan and Ohio. Though many more trips will be happening in my near future!!!

SB: Because this is an international publication, people from all over the world will be reading this. Many wonder what it is like to be a model. Please 

share some insight on your career in terms of what an average day is like for you.

JL: No matter where you’re at or from [geographically and figuratively], this industry is not easy. No one is going to give you a handout; you have to want it more than anything. [So on any given day, you must] live it and breathe it. I wake up every morning hungry for it. This industry is beautiful and has so many possibilities and opportunities, but you have to fight for it and want it more than anything else. [You have to] be passionate and be real.

SB: Some may also wonder about you on a more personal level, so please share what your interests outside of fashion include, as well as some
information about your social life.

JL: Even though this industry is a huge part of my life, not only on the modeling side, but also the hair artistry, having a social life isn't always easy. [Seeing as I’m] more of a hippie-gypsy type myself, I love just being out in nature with the sun on my face and good friends and music around me. I’m not really one you see at the bars, but you might see me at the park with a hula-hoop dancing around. Or even a long drive on a sunny day with my guy, listening to music… to me that’s just as good as therapy. Honestly, when I have days off, there’s nothing I would rather do than to just relax and take the day as it comes.

SB: Lastly, offer some advice for any individuals out there that strive to
successfully model and/or work in the fashion industry.

JL: Be yourself. You are unique and beautiful, and you have something to offer. Own that. Believe in yourself even [if and/or] when no one else
believes in you. Love yourself no matter what and the rest will follow. And lastly, never stop trying. Even when you have failed, get back up and keep fighting. [Remember,] no one else will fight for you if you won’t fight for you. #OneLoveFam

SB: Tell us about your blog. When did you start your blog, why did you start it, and how has it evolved?

LC: We started the blog in October, and I say “we” because I don't do it alone and I couldn't be happier with the team I've got. Actually my jobs are connected; I work at the blog together with the team from Feeric Fashion Week where I am the VP. To be
completely honest it started at a dinner where wine was involved, and after a lot of discussion about bloggers and funny stories, Mitichi, the president of Feeric, and Brylu, the other VP, decided to create this new brand: LandianaYolo. Why do it with me? First, because we work extremely well together and second, because we wanted to do something else, something new, another strategy… and it seems it’s working pretty well. After just a couple of months we managed to be present at the fashion weeks in London, Milan, Paris and Buenos Aires, and be featured in big magazines where I thought it was impossible to make it so early in my blogging
career. So now you understand why I said I have the best team. ;)

SB: How did you get involved and become the VP of FFW?

LC: I started to work in Feeric as a model nine years ago. After a while, Mitichi asked me to handle the castings and all the work that involved
managing models for the fashion week. Year after year I grew—from a model, to a casting director, then to a backstage coordinator and now, after 10 editions [of FFW] I am the VP. It’s amazing how much you can learn about fashion just by being backstage and not in front of the camera, as [I] was used [to] before. I look back now and I realize that Feeric was part of my life for so many years; actually I see it like a phenomenon, which attracts you with a
magnet-like force. So me, I just can’t quit because it’s just amazing. There are designers that have been with us for five years in a row. They always come back full of excitement and have only good words to say about it. That’s why more and more people are interested to showcase here or develop their activities. It's like an octopus that tempts you with every tentacle and each of it offers you something else: great experience[s], connections, friends, good time[s], and so after you have a taste of it, you can’t stop wishing to be part of it. That's also my story: I was part of it from the beginning, I grew with it, and I am so thankful for it!


SB: Are you or were you ever signed with any modeling agencies or have you
always free-lanced? 

LC: I always had an agency or agent. I find it extremely difficult doing this job as a freelancer. It takes a lot of experience and connections to make it on your own, especially when most of the clients prefer working with agencies. [Also,] as a freelancer it’s just impossible to know all the castings that are taking place.

SB: Where are you from and where do you reside now?

LC: Originally I am from Sibiu, Romania, a beautiful city full of history located in Transylvania, which I strongly recommend you visit. But even if this is my home, I travel so much that I can say I have a home in each country I travel to. In this period of the year I am in Sibiu for about four months, close to my team, so we can work for Feeric and make sure it's going to be great. Sometimes I feel like this home is just the place where I change my luggage from a trip to another, so now I enjoy [the chance] to be here for more than a couple of days so, so much. Between trips to Milan, Paris, Buenos Aires, Berlin, Guangzhou, Istanbul, Novi Sad and London, time spent home is priceless. Though now on my list of future travels, there is also New York, Seville, Dubai, Sofia, and I'm pretty sure many others will come up.

SB: When did you begin modeling? What was your first gig? Share the journey of your growth and success with us, especially how you transitioned so flawlessly into several different careers.

LC:  I first started modeling when I was 13, and a few months later I already signed a contract with an agency in Milan. So there I was, a young spoiled momma’s girl, alone in a big city with no idea how to cook or take care of myself. I remember I was so scared, and the idea of being there for three months scared me even more. The memory of me going for the first time to the agency is still very fresh in my mind: they gave me a map, a casting list, a "have a nice day," plus a smile. It was pouring [rain] outside and I was supposed to go to five castings. On my own. Alone. First thought was to sit somewhere and cry waiting for someone to come and help. But somehow I overcame my limits, and that helped me a lot in the years to come. I think of modeling as something great that happened to me but more as a
preparation for my other two activities: VP and blogger. They are all connected, and I am happy I had the chance to experience them all, [not being limited to] a specific one.
 

SB: Have you traveled anywhere for any of your gigs? If so, where? Share the
experience(s).

LC: As I said before, my first modeling trip was in Milan, where I lived for so many years that it became my home. I also lived in Paris for some months and that was magical. I will always be in love with that city. Even in the last couple of years, when I’m there it always seems to rain, so that’s hiding a bit of the magic charm of the city. Istanbul was another city I got to work in, and I liked the experience of new cultures. The same goes for Guangzhou, China. It’s great that modeling offers you the chance to visit and meet new people and see how they live in another part of the globe. Modeling is different in each of these countries, but each one is special in its own way. These were just the big cities I got to see, but some jobs were also in other cities and I was so fortunate to see so many of them, especially in Italy. I saw so many cities that I lost count, but at least I got to [learn to] speak the Italian language fluently, and I wish I could do that for each country I visit.

SB: Because this is an international publication, people from all over the world will be reading this. Many wonder what it is like to be a model in a metropolis, let alone a Vice President for a fashion week, among other roles you play! Please share some insight on your career in terms of what an average day (or week) looks like for you.

LC: Being a model is more or less the same all around the world. The job of a model actually has the same requirements everywhere. A day in my model life sometimes feels like a routine, but it's important to cherish each moment and make the most of it. If we talk of a casting day, it starts with the preparation you have to do on your own, not like when you have a modeling job and others do it for you. So hair, makeup, clothes, smile, good mood, and off you go! In Europe, usually you have a schedule where you have to make it on your own by metro or bus, but when in Asia you get a driver because it would be too hard to do 10 castings in a country where you don't understand the language. Especially if you get lost as often as I do. Between castings there is time for lunch, coffees – lots of coffees – and if talking about Italy, that could have become an addiction! When you finish the castings or the job, you have some free time for gym, going out or sleeping as much as you can – that is if you finish early. Those busy days make me appreciate the days when I am home more and I have time for myself to spend with friends, family, or working for Feeric. A day in my life looks different in each country: in Buenos Aires, for instance, each day I was walking for 10 km just to enjoy the view, but in China there are so many castings and jobs that the only thing I wanted to do when I finished was to put my head on the pillow.

SB: Many also may wonder about you on a more personal level, so please share what your interests outside of fashion include.

LC: On a more personal level... hmm, these three jobs make me complete for the moment, and I don’t have the time to develop an interest in something else. I always dreamt of traveling and meeting people all over the world, so this fulfills and I’m also able to work in between. I don't consider what I do a job, because it brings me so much pleasure that I don't see myself doing anything else. Sure, there are moments when I just want to lay on my sofa, watch movies next to my cat or have 

walks in the city when the phone doesn't ring, but in my opinion, when you love what you do, you just want to be active all the time without even feeling the weight. As long as I don't see my job as something that I “have” to do and [instead] 
something that I “want” to do, it makes me realize I am happy with what I have in life.

SB: Offer some advice for any individuals out there that strive to
successfully work in the fashion industry.

LC: Advice to the ones striving to have a successful career in the fashion
industry: don't set your expectation[s] too high. On the other hand, don't start with the idea that it’s impossible to reach something. It’s an industry like any other, so as long as you are committed and work for it, it will pay off sooner or later. And always, always look at the bright side of it. For example, first I thought "oh there are so many compromises that I have to make, I won’t be able to see my family for such a long time," but trust me: each
country I got to see offered me a new family. And the examples can go on. You just have to adapt to what this life is giving you. And you have to enjoy it!

 

 

SB: How were the concepts of the photo shoots featured in this issue born? Describe the creative process for us, focusing primarily on the photo shoot of the model painted in gold.

VL: The idea for this shoot came after I saw the glow of golden paint in the sun! It was at that moment that I wanted to emphasize the beauty of the female body using a golden luster. On the day of the photo session, I covered her body with oil, and then with a shine. The shooting itself took place
under constant light to emphasize the radiance of the sparkles on her body.

SB: How did you and this model meet and start working together?

VL: This model I noticed on the Internet, and immediately realized that she was ideal for this shoot, possessing a beautiful body and the energy that I needed.

SB: How long have you been a fashion photographer and what's your
greatest achievement to date?

VL: I have not worked as a photographer for too long, but I have always been fond of it. From early childhood I loved beautiful magazines, stylish photo sessions and beautiful models. For many years my life was devoted to dancing and designing, but I seriously cut off the design of clothes and accessories. Now I get incredible pleasure from working as a photographer! For me, this is art. This is expression of myself; expression of thoughts, 
feelings, even sensations – through a photo! I am inspired by beauty in
people, objects, and everything around me! Anything can be an inspiration. 
Currently, I am working on many editorials and photo shoots, each of which is special to me. Each model is unique and I prepare for each shoot
accordingly: I select images, clothes, accessories and décor. I do a lot with my own hands, thereby further emphasizing the individuality of each of my photo sessions, which were published in several Russian magazines and also used for advertising.

SB: Where are you from and where do you reside now?

VL: I come from Russia, though now I live in the city of Yekaterinburg.

SB: What was your first gig?

VL: My first shoot was in the forest during autumn. The model wanted to create a fashion editorial with a sense of mysticism, and the process, let alone the result, is what inspired me to move forward and create more, new interesting pictures.

SB: Your work stretches across several categories, for instance, boudoir/lingerie/nude. Much of it is considered very "sexy," and I'd like you to share your interpretation of that with readers and viewers.

VL: Why do my photos have a lot of sexuality and sensuality? Because I believe that it is sexual energy that causes a storm of emotions. Passion and tenderness are always exhibited. The eyes of the model must express this energy, and any of its ebb and flow. Often time, sensual surveys are obtained not intentionally, but simply because I myself exude this energy. For me, sexuality is an art. That's life!

SB: Lastly, offer some advice for any individuals out there that strive to successfully work in the fashion industry, specifically as a photographer.

VL: I believe that in order to be a successful photographer you have to live and "breathe" every shot! You need to immerse yourself in the process and improvise more at the photo session. To feel the model, in terms of his or her desires and character, is necessary. Otherwise, never take pictures "according to the rules.” Do not be afraid to go against these rules! In art there should be no rules! Art, especially through photography, is synonymous with freedom.

This editorial was born by a chance meeting through social media. The Olson’s, fans of designer Sherry E. Combs work, approached her about collaboration. Combs quickly agreed that she and sixteen-year-old model Sydney Olson would make a great team. Once the designs and styling ideas were born, then came the task of finding fellow creatives to bring the set to life.  Photographer Jeni Harter from Pieces of Life Photography was brought on board, as again, the Olson’s were “long blown away by her wonderful and creative portraiture.” Makeup artist Jordan Patterson was called upon next to offer her creative talents. The headpiece pictured upon Sydney’s head actually required bringing in set assistant, Jamie Russell, as it weighed seven pounds and reached a height of nearly two feet. Fusing several of our categories together, like those of fashion and beauty, we finally decided to feature “Concrete Jungle” here in the art section. Check out the team members further on their Instagram accounts.


PHOTOGRAPHER: JENI HARTER @photographypiecesoflife
MODEL: SYDNEY OLSON @olson_syd
DESIGNER: SHERRY E. COMBS @twt_design_wear
HAIR/MUA: JORDAN PATTERSON @jordan_skyy13
SHOOT COORDINATOR: ANGIE OLSON @angierolson
SET ASSISTANT: JAMIE RUSSELL

On any given day in Toulouse, France, or perhaps even further north in Paris, you may have the pleasure of happening upon one of Patrick Roux’s, renowned international fashion photographer, shoots. Roux took his first fashion photographs about thirty years ago. While he travels the globe now for work, he still shoots regularly in and around his hometown of Toulouse.

One of his favorite muses, Anne Claire, featured in these images, has been collaborating with Roux’s trusted eye for almost half a decade now – since 2013. They have worked together numerous times, all of which have been great experiences. “Anne Claire is an amazing model,” said Roux, as he explained how she is able to successfully adapt to the character of each shoot. More importantly, Roux added that Anne Claire is also just a “very nice person” in general and therefore, always a pleasure to creatively collaborate with.

In the first featured editorial of Roux’s, Anne Claire is photographed solo. The purpose of this shoot was to “work in a different way,” explained Roux, though upon learning even a little about the French fashion photographer, it’s clear he strives to shoot each new editorial in a different way from the last. He has somehow found a balance between classic sophistication and innovation.

At the time of this first editorial, Roux was especially inspired by images taken by the one-and-only Helmut Newton. The product was, for all of you to see here, a delicate, feminine take on an otherwise masculine theme and style. Upon seeing Anne Claire play this role so well, a larger idea was born in Roux’s mind. And it did not take long to execute.

A few weeks later, the second featured editorial was organized and executed. However, it is worth mentioning that Roux shared how challenging it can be organizing such a shoot. “You have to manage a whole team, [consisting of] makeup artist(s), hair stylist(s), model(s),” as Roux went on to further emphasize how every detail needs to be ideal for everyone, especially for the model. Though for Roux, there must simply be good ambiance, as it is “one of the keys to a successful shoot and great pictures.”

Brought on board for this next collaboration was another model named Fanny. Roux worked with her before, as well. He said, “Fanny is a very different model and a very good friend of Anne Claire, [which] was evident doing this duo shoot with them.” Their personal relationship only served the creative process well though, as their comfortability levels with one another amplified the images captured by Roux.

“I wanted to build a story about what could happen in the life of a couple, using one model in a man’s role and the other one in a woman’s role,” said Roux. He decided that Anne Claire would play the masculine role, as he was sure she could deliver, especially based on the results of their previously androgynous shoot together. Fanny, then, took on the female role. 
Roux is constantly taking pictures everywhere he goes. He has travelled all around the world, but desires to travel to more “unusual places” where he hopes to capture some great images. Last year, he was on the west coast of the United States shooting several editorials, which “was a wonderful
experience [getting to shoot] in wild landscapes with wonderful lights.” The year before that, Roux was in Japan, which became a place he holds near and dear to his heart.

On one of his first-ever shoots, Roux described producing very colorful
images against a beautifully blue sky. “I remember [this] was a long time ago when I did swimsuit pictures by the beach. [We were] in the water against big rocks in the Atlantic Ocean near Biarritz,” he said.

Having tackled every big city in Europe and the United States, Roux is
headed to South Africa this summer. After that, he plans to travel to Brazil, chasing after the joy that fashion photography truly brings him. For any
individuals who strive to work in the fashion industry, specifically as a
photographer, Roux offered a few words of advice: “Be yourself. Do not try to copy [others] – trust yourself. And always take pleasure.”

SB: How were the concepts of the photo shoots featured in this issue born? Describe the creative process for us.

JL: Actually, this set of photos is probably one of my favorites so far. I went with a small group of models to New York City for a week, [where we were] shooting every day, all day. We went out [each day, donning pre-] selected outfits based on the location, and the rest of it just came together. Feeling out the vibe and energy and working as a team [is how] the magic just starts to happen right before your eyes.

SB: How did you and photographer MikoKlubz meet and start working together

JL: A friend of mine told me about Miko. She had me friend him on
Facebook and follow all [of] his work. One day Miko posted about doing a group party shoot for aspiring models he never worked with, so I messaged him about coming out for that and worked with him ever since. Social media has been a great tool for me to meet new photographers and other people in the industry.

SB: Are you signed with any agencies?

JL: No, as of right now, I am not signed with any agency.

SB: Where are you from and where do you reside now?

JL: I’m from a small town outside of Toledo, Ohio and still live around the same area as of right now. I foresee myself living by a beach or mountains [with an incredible] view some day soon, haha.

SB: When did you begin modeling? What was your first gig?

JL: Only about two years now. I am [also] a hairstylist, and one day a client who is
a wedding photographer asked me if I would be her model for a class she was going to. Ever since then I have been modeling when I'm not working behind the chair.

SB: Have you traveled anywhere for any of your gigs? If so, where? 
JL: So far I have traveled to New York City, [as well as] all around Michigan and Ohio. Though many more trips will be happening in my near future!!!

SB: Because this is an international publication, people from all over the world will be reading this. Many wonder what it is like to be a model. Please 

share some insight on your career in terms of what an average day is like for you.

JL: No matter where you’re at or from [geographically and figuratively], this industry is not easy. No one is going to give you a handout; you have to want it more than anything. [So on any given day, you must] live it and breathe it. I wake up every morning hungry for it. This industry is beautiful and has so many possibilities and opportunities, but you have to fight for it and want it more than anything else. [You have to] be passionate and be real.

SB: Some may also wonder about you on a more personal level, so please share what your interests outside of fashion include, as well as some
information about your social life.

JL: Even though this industry is a huge part of my life, not only on the modeling side, but also the hair artistry, having a social life isn't always easy. [Seeing as I’m] more of a hippie-gypsy type myself, I love just being out in nature with the sun on my face and good friends and music around me. I’m not really one you see at the bars, but you might see me at the park with a hula-hoop dancing around. Or even a long drive on a sunny day with my guy, listening to music… to me that’s just as good as therapy. Honestly, when I have days off, there’s nothing I would rather do than to just relax and take the day as it comes.

SB: Lastly, offer some advice for any individuals out there that strive to
successfully model and/or work in the fashion industry.

JL: Be yourself. You are unique and beautiful, and you have something to offer. Own that. Believe in yourself even [if and/or] when no one else
believes in you. Love yourself no matter what and the rest will follow. And lastly, never stop trying. Even when you have failed, get back up and keep fighting. [Remember,] no one else will fight for you if you won’t fight for you. #OneLoveFam

 

 

PHOTOGRAPHER: CHAD COSPER  MODEL: EKATERINA ESTES  STYLIST: LAURA KIRKPATRICK

PHOTOGRAPHER: CHAD COSPER
MODEL: EKATERINA ESTES
STYLIST: LAURA KIRKPATRICK

During NYFW I had the pleasure of meeting with fellow artist/photographer, Chad Cosper. As we walked through Soho in downtown Manhattan, he shared a project with me. It’s called “Climbing Walls” and features a now Kentucky-residing model. She is also this issue’s Spotlight Model, and upon reading her story, you’ll understand why.
 
A little over two decades ago, an alcoholic woman gave birth to a little girl in a rundown shack somewhere in Russia. Two days later, she dropped her on the doorstep of a nearby orphanage and fled. During the little girl’s years there, she only ever gained 23 pounds in total weight, donned a mandatory shaved head, and learned, as Cosper put it, “children in her orphanage generally faced one of two fates in life. [They] were either adopted, or were released to the streets at 13 years old where most were bought and sold on the black market and became victims of human trafficking.”

Fortunately, this little girl beat the odds and was adopted by an American family that wanted nothing more than to protect, love and support her. She was named Ekaterina Estes, less formally known as Katya, and it took her entire adolescence into young adulthood for the “happy ending” she deserved to come to fruition. If that’s where you thought we were in the story, keep reading.
 
Unbeknownst to Katya’s adoptive family, her new paternal grandfather saw her, essentially, as the perfect victim. He sexually abused her for years, telling her that if she were to ever disclose the abuse, she would be sent back to Russia without a mommy or daddy again. And so, she stayed silent. She stayed silent because “he was the biggest monster in [her] life.” She stayed silent until she reached middle school, as the abuse was getting worse. She was scared, but she was courageous. Fear was turning to fight.

Immediately taken to an advocacy center, Family and Children’s Place, where Katya eventually earned a
National Award, she was first told, “You are protected now. This is not your fault.” They made her feel like a safe and well-loved “survivor.” However, Katya does not particularly care for the term. She knows it isn’t
something you simply survive and move past, as the daily battle with PTSD and depression constantly
remind her. Katya told me, “The word warrior is more suitable.”
 
When I learned of Katya’s criminal and civil cases in Louisville, I was admittedly unprepared for both the immensity and intensity. It had strung on for years and years and in turn, became “the biggest part of [her] life.” News reports show James Estes constantly in court, particularly for violating his
probation over and over, and as Katya explained, “it felt like they slapped him on the wrist over and over again,” too. Her own personal monster continued to be a free man.

Prosecutors finally sent Katya to David Yates, a civil lawyer in Louisville, who became “an amazing support in [her] life because he understands the importance of justice in the community.” Yates knew that Katya deserved her day in court, so again, they went to trial, and Katya testified for two straight days. This past July, she won. James Estes pled guilty to raping his granddaughter and was convicted of first-degree sexual abuse of a minor under the age of 12.

Katya was also awarded a large sum of money, although she knows she will hardly receive any of it, and she is fine with that. “All I ever wanted was to seek justice, make a stand in the community and be strong for other people who have experienced trauma similar to mine,” said Katya. It’s important to her that others know this is a common day-to-day battle for many, but most importantly she wants all warriors to know they are not alone.

Currently, Katya is modeling, studying criminal justice in school, and continuing to be an advocate in her community. Even though she states that her innocence was taken from her the day she became that man’s target, she knows it is because she was weak from the orphanage, and definitely not weak in spirit. She refused to let him take anything else from her, “especially because [she] was born with nothing, not even
parents.” However, she is so deeply loved by the mother and father she has today, as well as her brothers.

Ekaterina Estes “came to America with the rights to be loved, privileged and hopeful, and today will be stronger and more powerful than he will ever be,” she explained, “because I stood up. Nothing can silence me anymore.” 

By Sky Braun

MFM Editor/Writer

This past winter, the second annual Rajasthan Heritage Week was held in India to showcase the versatility of heritage fabrics to buyers worldwide, in the form of modern fashionable silhouettes for any occasion. The event was first announced at Bikaner House in New Delhi, where a special showcase by Bibi Russel and Abraham Thakore unveiled the stunning design that would characterize the three-day fashion extravaganza.

It is not difficult to see the magic infused into the country’s artisanal crafts and textiles. Rajasthan Heritage Week, spearheaded by Prasad Bidapa Associates in affiliation with the Khadi Board and the Government of Rajasthan, is a window into these particular historical and handmade fabrics, unique to the state.

What gives the state of Rajasthan its unique identity are definitely the weavers and innumerable printers, dyers, and artisans, who comprise one of the largest working populations in the industry. The three-day event showcased, celebrated, and honored the excruciating labor of national award winning weavers from places like Bagru, Jaipur, Sanganer, Kaithoon, Mangrol, Barmer, Baran, and Pokhran, while highlighting the cutting-edge, modern designs of Abraham Thakore, Raghavendra Rathore, Rajesh Pratap Singh, Hemant Trevedi, Rohit Bal, Vidhi Singhania, Ajay Kumar, Himmat Singh, Nivedita Saboo, David Abraham & Rakesh Thakore, Sunaina Sood, and many others. It was a true testament to not only the exceptional beauty of the nation’s artisanal textiles, but also the ease with which Indian and international designers inject their design aesthetic into these fabrics.

Last year’s debut of this event with “Handmade in Rajasthan,” was such a pioneered initiative it was recognized on the global fashion map. People became interested and willing to pay a price for handmade goods, which translated into higher wages for weavers who tirelessly work to uphold the legacy of their forefathers. This uplifted the weavers’ confidence and offered a sense of direction, guided by the designers, who helped the local artisans engage with other leading national and international designers. The objective of building the brand, “Handmade in Rajasthan,” is to attach the tag of luxury to every piece of fabric woven by hand, as it represents something more – something spiritual. Appropriately called the “Fabric of Freedom,” it will now create increased employment and better quality of life for every artisan in the state.

This past Rajasthan Heritage Week was held in the capital of Rajasthan, India: a place called Jaipur. If you remember from our last issue, we featured images from a local Jaipur photographer, Prachi Sharma. We were lucky enough to have Sharma unofficially cover Rajasthan Heritage Week this year, capturing the vibrant, intricate and one-of-a-kind designs that admittedly are seductive to a western-conditioned eye. So get ready to eat your hearts out, world. India knows fashion in a very intimate way, and it’s time the fashion industry knew India.

As an international fashion photographer on the rise, Sharma was determined to cover the event this year, even if it meant without invitation. She explained how difficult it was for her to find space to shoot the runway, as there were so many official, as well as unofficial photographers already
occupying all the room. However, Sharma liked the challenge: “In fact, I enjoyed the event a lot. My experience was really good, and I got really good shots,” despite vying for space amongst the other
eager photographers. She played with perception and composition of her shots during the show and as a result, learned a great deal. “Basically, I just wanted to create some dramatic shots [that] tell more about the scene and actions of the runway,” said Sharma, who offered a last bit of advice: in
 order to make your own runway images stand out against others, do no worry about planting yourself in the prime location; rather take advantage of the space you’re in and better yet, embrace its
challenges. This way, you’ll have to play with the composition and take much more notice of the
choreography and movement to produce better frames.

Sharma offered a list, in no particular order, of the designers whose collections she photographed  from this past Rajasthan Heritage Week:

-Vidhi Singhania is quite the grand dame of fashion, with her wedding & troussea collections much in demand for their classical elegance and attention to luxurious
detail. Jewel-toned ensembles glowed on the runway.

-Ajay Kumar, based out of Bangalore, debuted at Rajasthan Heritage Week with a fabulous range of menswear that demonstrated just how versatile Khadi fabric is. Eye-popping colors and patterns, combined with his slick silhouettes made a sensational impact.

-Himmat Singh of Jaipur used Rajasthan Khadi to the maximum effect for his sharply tailored menswear. Known for his ceremonial and occasion wear, Himmat has long championed the cause of cotton & wool Khadi fabric.

-Hemant Trevedi is one of the most gifted designers in India. He worked with the weavers and block printers of Rajasthan to create a tribute to the Modern Mahatma in a collection that dazzled the audience.

 -Rohit Bal chose the lightest of natural Kota Doria fabric from the weavers of Kaithoon, as well as fine-spun Khadi fabric to create his ethereal line of ensembles, combining print and embroidery to add texture and richness in color.

 -Rajesh Pratap Singh creates luxury like nobody else. Each piece is a treasure, reflecting a purity of spirit and skill that brought Rajasthan Khadi to life.

-Sunaina Sood emerged from Hyderabad with a collection developed with Rajasthan  Khadi, reminiscent of petals unfurling and sweeping trapezoid silhouettes.

-Raghavendra Rathore spells sophistication in everything he does. His suave menswear and elegant womenswear created the perfect Grand Finale.

Every designer showcased richly handcrafted designs, integrated with a blend of traditional textiles through modern appeal and techniques; beautifully photographed by Prachi Sharma and proudly featured by MFM – for all of you. 

By Sky Braun

MFM Editor/Writer

ARTIST: CAROLINE REED

ARTIST: CAROLINE REED

Born and raised in the UK, Caroline Reed practices her art through exploration of childhood memories: some traumatic and emotional. Reed says that she “has a fascination with the bizarre and the unusual, which stems back to a film [she] watched as a child called ‘The Freaks.’ [She] remember[s] having such sympathy with the individuals in the film, [as] it had a profound affect on the way [she] view[s] people who [are] different.” 

As a result, her influenced perspective affected the way in which she now works. For example, her assemblages have a “touch of nostalgia and a fragility to them,” Reed explains.

Admittedly, Reed tends to make work that reflects the passing of time. Her goal is to create a visual language rooted in her past. “I am telling a story that suggests a narrative using metaphors and images, offering the viewer their own interpretation and internal dialogue,” said Reed.

Check out more of her work online via Facebook, Instagram, and Twitter. 

By Sky Braun

MFM Editor/Writer

PHOTOGRAPHER: MELISSA COSPER MODEL: HELLEN SMITH HAIR/MUA: MALORIE AVALINE, BEAUTY UNVEILED STYLIST: EUREKA CALHOUN, VELVET LOPE


PHOTOGRAPHER: MELISSA COSPER
MODEL: HELLEN SMITH
HAIR/MUA: MALORIE AVALINE, BEAUTY UNVEILED
STYLIST: EUREKA CALHOUN, VELVET LOPE

PHOTOGRAPHER: MELISSA COSPER
“I'm from Oklahoma City. I am a fairly new photographer, having only done this professionally for about six years. Once I started, I fell in love with the creativity of capturing something that I could only imagine in my mind. As a 16-year elementary educator, it gave me a new avenue to learn and create something that challenged me. I started as a family photographer and then slowly was introduced into the world of fashion photography by a local fashion magazine. This is where I began to see the realm of possibilities that fashion photography had available. Even though I still do family/wedding/senior photography, I really feel creatively challenged by fashion. I think it's helped me step outside the box with my other shoots as well. I mostly shoot locally in my studio or on location somewhere in the city, but travel all over the world and find inspiration everywhere I go.

The team from this shoot is made up of some of Oklahoma City's finest creatives, who are always pushing the boundaries of what is fashionable. This was my first time to work with stylist Eureka Calhoun, but I've watched her work over the past few years and always loved her vintage touch. Hellen was the muse for the shoot since she had just recently gotten a cropped haircut and we wanted to highlight her bone structure that was now visible. Malorie was our hair/makeup artist for the shoot, and I've worked with her extensively throughout the years. We love collaborating together and thinking of new ways to be creative. [We] like to think of ourselves as the ‘Dream Team!’ For the lighting of the shoot, I wanted to create a moody feel instead of a crisp white background. To do this, I only used one light with a large octobox modifier offset to the left of the model. There was a bounce board to the right of the model to fill in the shadows. I liked that the lighting was reminiscent of an old 70's Sears catalog. In the end, I think we captured the essence of the 70's vibe that the clothing demanded.”

HAIR/MUA: MALORIE AVALINE
“As a salon owner who thrives on education, inspiration and teamwork, these creative editorial shoots are what I live for. Growing up around the lights and stage as a dancer, I knew that I wanted to be in an industry where I could express myself creatively. Being a hair stylist and makeup artist allows me to collaborate with other creatives to produce insanely beautiful images. I was attracted to editorial styling specifically because, to me, it's almost like we are telling a story. We have a vision and the model takes on the character based on what we are creating together. 

Being in the professional beauty industry for 10 years and being able to consistently create helps me to express myself and continue to evolve. I pull inspiration from many places. Sometimes it's something in my surroundings, other times it's a feeling that I want to portray [or] literally something I dream. If at the end of a creative editorial shoot we all walk away feeling excitement and more inspired, then we did what we came to do!”

STYLIST: EUREKA CALHOUN
“I’m originally from Troy, Alabama. The majority of my childhood I was raised overseas as a military brat. While living in Japan, Guam, and Germany, just to name a few, my zeal for the fashion world was birthed. Fast forward, attended Alabama A&M University and received my bachelors of Science degree in Early Childhood Education and my MBA in Educational Leadership. During my career as an educator, I would play a constant tug of war between my present career and my passion for wardrobe styling. Eventually, I made the decision to create a plan of action to start pursuing my dreams in the fashion industry. Now five years later, I’m the current owner and operator of a wardrobe styling and image consulting company called Velvet Lope Styling.

The 70’s have intrigued me as a rocking good time given the diversity and energy both literally and figuratively. The Japanese street fashion scene was a major influence. Their carefree fashion style choices, like mesh skirts [and] frayed knits with satin pajama robes, provided a fresh perspective during the 70’s. And as someone who grew up in the 80’s, I was ecstatic to see the reemerge of one my favorite eras, interpreted in the spring 2015 collections of Gucci and Chanel. For the shoot, I pulled influences from the romantic era of 70’s fashion; when it was all about freedom, a variety of colors, eclectic looks and a tendency to mix and match different styles with each other. I will always love and appreciate the [1970’s] for the expression of individuality and timeless style.”

MODEL: HELLEN SMITH
“Hellen Smith grew up in Oklahoma City with her mother and three sisters. She began acting at the age of ten and has experience in both commercial acting and theater. In 2015, Hellen began her modeling career. She has walked in runway shows for Tracy Reese, Stella Thomas and Alexis Monsanto. She has worked as an ecommerce model for JC Penney’s, LA Sun & Sport and Rankkd. Hellen is successfully juggling her pursuits in the modeling field while maintaining a full time schedule as a Stella Adler Drama Student at NYU Tisch School of the Arts. 

Hellen [was also] Miss Oklahoma Teen USA in 2016, and continues much of the community service and volunteer work that she began during her reign. Her favorite charity in New York City is Hearts of Gold, whose mission and purpose is reimagining the future of homeless mothers and their children. She recently volunteered as a face painter at Hearts of Gold event, and walked in their charity fashion show. Hellen is passionate about both acting and modeling and believes she will be equally successful in both areas of the entertainment field. She intends to act and model for the rest of her life. When Hellen prepares for a shoot she researches the time period, music and celebrities of the era. She enjoys combining her love for acting into her shoots and names every ‘character’ that she becomes for the shoot.”

By Sky Braun

MFM Editor/Writer
 

PHOTOGRAPHER: AARON MCCOPLIN MODELS: ASHLEIGH, EMILY, KIM, SALLY HAIR/MUA: KATIE WILSON DESIGNER: JOANNE SHEPHERD STYLIST: JUVELLE ACCESSORIZER: JESSICA BRATICH

PHOTOGRAPHER: AARON MCCOPLIN
MODELS: ASHLEIGH, EMILY, KIM, SALLY
HAIR/MUA: KATIE WILSON
DESIGNER: JOANNE SHEPHERD
STYLIST: JUVELLE
ACCESSORIZER: JESSICA BRATICH

MummActiv is a new brand of active wear for pregnant and nursing mothers, designed by Joanne Shepherd from Perth, West Australia. As a personal trainer, teacher, and let’s not forget – mother of two – Shepherd is encouraging other mothers to stay active during pregnancy and nursing “one fashionable step at a time.”

Shepherd spent the last two years developing an expert collection of active wear for pregnant and nursing mothers, which is proving to be a hit in not only West Australia, but around the globe. It is innovative for maternity active wear, no doubt, though MummActiv is blazing a bigger trail for West Australian fashion, catapulting it into the very lucrative U.S. market.

Since, the label caught the attention of a major wholesaler and developed a loyal and still growing customer base, with the U.S. and Canada attributing for most overseas sales. Shepherd regularly ships products to clients in both countries from her online retail store.

Approximately 18 months ago, Shepherd became pregnant with not only her second son, but also the idea of creating active wear for pregnant and/or nursing mothers. She found it increasingly difficult to find active wear that accommodated her growing bump, and even more difficult following the birth of her son, Sam.

As a committed trainer, Shepherd feared that if the lack of appropriate clothing was making even her
uncomfortable, then how many other women must concur? Women who are already struggling to keep fit during and after pregnancy are more prone to giving up altogether if they do not feel confident in what they are wearing, according to Shepherd, and, well, common sense.

“I was training with the advice of my doctors and ran up to 32 weeks for cardio fitness. I found it really hard and had to continue to wear my normal size gym gear, in bigger sizes, as everything else was hideous in style and sizing and completely [non-functional],” explained Shepherd. “When Sam was born, I was in the gym four days after [giving] birth [because of] my continued frustrations with not being able to find stylish active wear for my current stage – [at that point, breastfeeding] – and so I found myself continually having to interchange sports [bras] with nursing bras,” she went on.

So from the well of frustration and seemingly silent female suffering, the seed for MummActiv was planted: “the philosophy of MummActiv is about trying to help mums stay active and break down the barriers stopping them from partaking in an active pursuit. For a lot of mums, it is that they feel they do not look good and are not comfortable and [therefore] do not want to join in. [This sort of attitude] really takes us back to years ago when being pregnant was almost like being ill – [it] stopped you from doing things.”

It is Joanne Shepherd’s goal with MummActiv to break the cycle and silence of this backward thinking. As the age of first time moms in West Australia rises, Shepherd exclaims how important it is to ensure that your body is fit for pregnancy and that it remains fit during recovery. In West Australia, the average for a first time mother is nearly 31 years old. Although across Australia, including its western region, the fertility rate for 30-34 year olds is the highest of any and all age groups, according to an ABS release a few months ago.

If donning MummActiv, you agree that staying fit during and after pregnancy is not at all about looking like a celebrity or participating in a baby weight-loss competition. Instead, it is about giving your body the best chance of having an uncomplicated birth and recovery, especially if you are in the older age bracket.

Shepherd said that she “had [her] first child 17 years ago when [she] was quite young. The second time [she] was an older mum at [age] 37, and being fit made a huge difference to both [her] labor and recovery. [She] knows the risk of complication would have been higher if [she] was not active.”

A final note from Shepherd is targeted specifically at mothers-to-be and new mothers who may have concerns about joining a gym amidst all the other stresses and expenses that come along with having a baby, particularly given West Australia’s (and various other countries) economy at the current moment. She does not want this to hinder any mother or mother-to-be with the desire to maintain a healthy lifestyle, either. She claims that these expensive fees are unnecessary because of very simple exercises able to be done anywhere. “They make a real difference, particularly walking and light weights,” explained Shepherd, as she offered her self-made and successful list of the “Five Best Activities for Mums-To-Be:”

1.     Walking strengthens the heart and lungs and increases stamina.

2.     Swimming or water exercises also strengthen the heart and lungs, while reducing strain on joints.

3.     Prenatal Pilates strengthens the entire body, especially core muscles.

4.     Weight training increases muscle tone and strength.

5.     Prenatal Yoga increases strength, stamina, and of course, relaxation.

While Shepherd’s words of wisdom come with a remarkable referral, as always, the most imperative advice is to consult with your own doctor and trainer. In the meantime, browse Shepherd’s sexy, confidence boosting; yet functional and practical collections of maternity active wear before paying a visit to the online store at www.mummactiv.com!

By Sky Braun

MFM Editor/Writer

PHOTOGRAPHER: SVETLANA BLASUCCI MODEL: MARCELLA MARQUES AGENCY: BMG MODELS HAIR STYLIST: SERGIO ESTRADA MUA: MARC WITMER DESIGNER: KATHRIN HENON RETOUCHER: MARC WITMER

PHOTOGRAPHER: SVETLANA BLASUCCI
MODEL: MARCELLA MARQUES
AGENCY: BMG MODELS
HAIR STYLIST: SERGIO ESTRADA
MUA: MARC WITMER
DESIGNER: KATHRIN HENON
RETOUCHER: MARC WITMER

Originally a baker from Chicago, Sergio Estrada shared his chronological journey to becoming a revered hairstylist in New York City, exclusively with MFM. Estrada actually grew up working in the food service industry, so after attending school for baking, he naturally began decorating cakes. He said he felt this was a true art form. Shortly after delving into his original career plan, he realized that while he did have a sincere passion for it, it was not as gratifying as he hoped. It felt like more of a hobby for Estrada, and not what he was destined to do long-term.

At this point, Estrada opted to entirely switch paths from a creative one to a more business-oriented
position. He took a job in retail and responsibly maintained his position for three years, until the day he woke up and again realized he was not on track with his true calling. After doing some serious soul searching, he remembered his childhood. His mother attended beauty school at a very young age, and many of Estrada’s friends also worked in the field. He finally came to the conclusion that he would try it out, himself: “Since I was not fully committed to the idea, I enrolled in a community college near my apartment that offered a cosmetology program.”

Estrada’s first day at this new school was intimidating, to say the least. Everyone else enrolled seemed to be more knowledgeable and passionate about the field. “I felt secluded and pretty lost,” admitted Estrada, “[but] I figured I’d stay for a semester and see how it went.” Upon enrolling in school, Estrada also traded in his retail job for a position in a salon. It was a receptionist position, but Estrada was determined to engulf himself in the field in order to learn as much as possible by supplementing his new education with real-life
experience.

Fast forward two years, and Estrada was already working full-time in an upscale salon with his diploma in hand. “I was learning more at work than I [had] in school, [and] I had become so dedicated to artistry of hair, [I] was excited to go into work every day and learn something new: a new technique, a new hairstyle, a new color formula,” expressed Estrada.

However, under the surface, he was not only questioning his life path again, but also certain something still wasn’t in place. Estrada admitted that by the time he graduated cosmetology school, he already knew he did not want to work in a salon. Stylists had many gaps in their days, would receive cancellations regularly, and spent a lot of time just waiting around. It also seemed like the senior hairstylists were not motivated or even excited about hair anymore with their same routine and same clients, day in and day out. Estrada explained, “I had fallen in love with hair and didn’t want to become mundane.”

The salon was still a great place for Estrada though, as it was a stepping-stone in his path to success and personal fulfillment. It carried Bumble & Bumble hair products for sale. For those of you who are not familiar with Bumble & Bumble, not only are they a franchised salon with a line of stellar hair products; they also famously offer professional hair classes at their university in New York. In addition, they tour salons in order to demonstrate looks produced at fashion week by their top stylists. “This is what opened my eyes to the editorial world of [hair]styling,” exclaimed Estrada, “I was obsessed!”

Six years later, at only 29 years young, Estrada explained how he works strictly freelance with editorial styling as his main focus. He has lived in New York City for just one year, though, which he claimed has opened up many doors. “I have worked three seasons of fashion week, assisted on set for major magazines, and work endlessly on perfecting my portfolio,” said Estrada. He believes his largest obstacle to overcome so far was actually moving to New York City. Finding a home and figuring out how to make ends meet in such a “crazy expensive city” was not lost on Estrada. He further explained:

"Once I figured that out, focusing on my goal and making connections seemed so effortless. I have a vision of where I see myself in ten years and that’s to be a celebrity hairstylist. I just need to continue to keep pushing myself and creating art every day. When I look back at how far I’ve come in the last year, or rather six months when I actually left the salon life and focused on editorial [styling], I can’t believe how much
I’ve achieved! I feel truly blessed every morning for being put on earth and having the hands and eyes that were given to me to create all this beauty. I’ve been published a dozen times, this is my second interview, and I continue to meet other artists that inspire and push me to better myself."

Inspired by Chanel’s 2013 resort collection, Estrada incorporated the short, lilac wig pictured on the model in this featured editorial. Thanks to his team for this specific collaboration, as well as all other photographers, models, makeup artists, designers, fashion stylists, and fellow hairstylists, Estrada continues to accept any challenges presented to him in order to finally assume his destiny as a master hairstylist.

By Sky Braun

MFM Editor/Writer

PHOTOGRAPHER: BHARATHAN KANGATHERAN MODEL: MELISSA G. HAIR/STYLIST: JEAN-MARIE CALISTRI MUA: OLIVIA PICKENS

PHOTOGRAPHER: BHARATHAN KANGATHERAN
MODEL: MELISSA G.
HAIR/STYLIST: JEAN-MARIE CALISTRI
MUA: OLIVIA PICKENS

“I prefer to spend my life, in every aspect, away from my desk and away from my computer. And I do, as much as I can. You have one life in this world – be true to it,” is the mantra of our final feature artist in this issue. A competitively ranked stunt, hang gliding, and commercial pilot with multi-engine and turbine time, along with certifications as a motor biking, sailing, windsurfing, and diving instructor, it’s as confusing as it is inspirational to realize all these titles belong to Perth, Australian, Bharathan Kangatheran. The one title he surprisingly does not prefer to claim is that of photographer. He has no formal training, whatsoever, nor does he own a single manual or book on photography. He explained that “photography, first and foremost, is an ART” and currently, with the prevalence of software, many, sadly, lose sight of this. He went on to show an example of an edited image, done by a very talented digital artist via Photoshop. He pointed out how there was no model, no wardrobe or styling, no physical location – nothing other than software and drawing/rendering skills. “That’s how easy it is to be creative with software… This is not photography in my mind!” BK exclaimed and went on to further explain:

"I am not saying that editing software doesn't have its place. I am saying that you cannot call Digital Art (edited images) photography. In the old days of film - what took hours to create, years to learn and apply properly [like] masking, dodging and  burning, now takes a few seconds, if that…without much need for        knowledge and skill. The current version of Adobe Photoshop (CC2017) is so much more powerful and the tools in there to create are just breathtaking!"

Learning to be what BK calls a “photographic artist” is his greatest advice. First, this requires that you master light, even making it your friend. “Without light, you have nothing,” he said. Next, know your equipment and your own skill. Last, “learn your subject quickly and know their comfort zone, angles and colors and know what it is you want to achieve with your subject. Then go and achieve it with confidence,” he stated.

When asked how he formulated and so confidently then executed the concept for “Enchanted Entanglement,” the editorial featured here, he explained having a similar idea in mind for a hair and makeup piece. Hair stylist, Jean Marie, elaborated on this idea when he shared wanting to shoot something with rope. “I wanted to create something that was not a photo-shopped creation and yet attention grabbing,” BK said. The shoot was not only successful in his eyes, no pun intended, but also inspirational. He explained, “The posing and movement requirements of the model were a little ‘demanding’ physically and it was important for the creatives to ‘rest’ the model for a few minutes, in between segments, to allow her to stretch and take the weight off her feet.”

BK said he tries to keep his creative process simple by using only the “power of light,” location, and his creative team to produce aesthetically appealing images. However, no matter the concept or creative process, he reminded that you must always be prepared to spontaneously evolve said concept. Lastly, he offered this:

"Be honest to yourself and realistic about your suitability to be a photographic artist, about what it is you wish to achieve and why you’re taking up this art form and be realistic about your abilities to achieve these goals. I wanted to be an astronaut as a kid, and then an international airline pilot, but settled for being a commercial pilot in charter & aerial work operations. We need to be realistic. Sometimes, we are at the wrong place and time to achieve what our potentials allow - accept it and move on! Don't fake it with editing and cling on! Value your time, value your skill, value your equipment, value your ideas, value yourself."

By Sky Braun

MFM Editor/Writer

Unlike most other species of living organisms, humans have a constant drive to accumulate wealth beyond that which is needed for mere survival. Unfortunately, the human drive for success and material often manifests as lust, greed, and gluttony. Excess is a driving theme in this editorial as the beautiful subject literally bleeds gold.  This collaboration of a beauty shoot was conceived by some of Oklahoma’s most respected creatives. While the shoot was coordinated and filmed by creative director, Chad Cosper, his partner, Melissa Cosper, photographed the striking images. As a husband and wife team, the two create art together for nearly 20 years now.  Malorie Avaline developed the hair and makeup concept. Avaline’s beauty work can be seen in magazines, on television, featured at New York Fashion Week, and even worn by Miss USA.  Nail artist, Lillian Barron, created custom Swarovski crystal-embellished nails, designed to help communicate the theme of excess.  ABOUT THE ARTISTS:  Chad – "My love of photography and film began at an early age. From the time I snapped the shutter on a 110 Kodak with the rotating flashcube, I was hooked. During my teenage years, I developed composition skills and an editorial eye under the guidance of my high school journalism teacher. During this time, I also laid hands on my first VHS camcorder and my life was never the same. I quickly learned that I could transfer my still photography skills into capturing moving images. After all, video is just about 30 still images strung together every second. By learning to capture motion, I began to develop my photographic style.  To me, organic beauty is seen in every passing glance, wind teased hair, and flutter of fabric. As with many artists, I find beauty in the subtle flaws of an image. Most of my recent projects focus on model development, fashion, and commercial photography and video. Many of the models I’ve had the opportunity to shoot have been placed with top agencies in the U.S. and around the world. Although there are certain elements of my images that I try to keep consistent, I thrive on collaboration and teamwork.  My creative and production work has been seen around the globe in magazines, online, and on network television. My clients have included the NFL, NBC, ABC, OWN, FashionTV Paris, Supermodels Unlimited, and many more. I have been blessed to work all across the United States from the East to West coasts, the Caribbean, Central and South America, West Africa, London, Paris, Milan, Rome, Munich, Prague, and Tel Aviv."  Melissa – "My introduction into photography was mostly by accident. It started as a way to raise money to go on a mission trip to Africa and blossomed. Once there, I realized the need for perspective in America. America is the land of excess; people always wanting more and never happy with what they already have. While in Ghana, I experienced a life with the bare necessities and witnessed people who were genuinely happy, even though they had very little. I came away from that experience wanting to keep that perspective as much as possible.  I have a photo that I took while there that has been turned into a painting that hangs in my living room. It hangs there to remind me to be grateful for the little things, and to appreciate all the bonuses that life affords as an American citizen. At first glance, you might only see the dirt road and dilapidated buildings,but all I see is the beauty of the bold red dress and the contrast of the blue wall behind the little girl. It inspired me to continue to create and capture the beauty of life in all aspects.  What began as a hobby quickly became my passion. I began working as a professional photographer, which has since given me opportunities to travel the world, work with celebrities, and capture some of life’s most meaningful moments for many people."  By Sky Braun  MFM Editor/Writer

Unlike most other species of living organisms, humans have a constant drive to accumulate wealth beyond that which is needed for mere survival. Unfortunately, the human drive for success and material often manifests as lust, greed, and gluttony. Excess is a driving theme in this editorial as the beautiful subject literally bleeds gold.

This collaboration of a beauty shoot was conceived by some of Oklahoma’s most respected creatives. While the shoot was coordinated and filmed by creative director, Chad Cosper, his partner, Melissa Cosper, photographed the striking
images. As a husband and wife team, the two create art together for nearly 20 years now.

Malorie Avaline developed the hair and makeup concept. Avaline’s beauty work can be seen in magazines, on television, featured at New York Fashion Week, and even worn by Miss USA.

Nail artist, Lillian Barron, created custom Swarovski crystal-embellished nails, designed to help communicate the theme of excess.

ABOUT THE ARTISTS:

Chad –
"My love of photography and film began at an early age. From the time I snapped the shutter on a 110 Kodak with the rotating flashcube, I was hooked. During my teenage years, I developed composition skills and an editorial eye under the
guidance of my high school journalism teacher. During this time, I also laid hands on my first VHS camcorder and my life was never the same. I quickly learned that I could transfer my still photography skills into capturing moving images. After all, video is just about 30 still images strung together every second. By learning to capture motion, I began to develop my photographic style.

To me, organic beauty is seen in every passing glance, wind teased hair, and flutter of fabric. As with many artists, I find beauty in the subtle flaws of an image. Most of my recent projects focus on model development, fashion, and
commercial photography and video. Many of the models I’ve had the opportunity to shoot have been placed with top agencies in the U.S. and around the world. Although there are certain elements of my images that I try to keep consistent, I thrive on collaboration and teamwork.

My creative and production work has been seen around the globe in magazines, online, and on network television. My clients have included the NFL, NBC, ABC, OWN, FashionTV Paris, Supermodels Unlimited, and many more. I have been blessed to work all across the United States from the East to West coasts, the Caribbean, Central and South America, West Africa, London, Paris, Milan, Rome, Munich, Prague, and Tel Aviv."

Melissa –
"My introduction into photography was mostly by accident. It started as a way to raise money to go on a mission trip to Africa and blossomed. Once there, I realized the need for perspective in America. America is the land of excess; people always wanting more and never happy with what they already have. While in Ghana, I experienced a life with the bare
necessities and witnessed people who were genuinely happy, even though they had very little. I came away from that experience wanting to keep that perspective as much as possible.

I have a photo that I took while there that has been turned into a painting that hangs in my living room. It hangs there to remind me to be grateful for the little things, and to appreciate all the bonuses that life affords as an American citizen. At first glance, you might only see the dirt road and dilapidated buildings,but all I see is the beauty of the bold red dress and the contrast of the blue wall behind the little girl. It inspired me to continue to create and capture the beauty of life in all aspects.

What began as a hobby quickly became my passion. I began working as a professional photographer, which has since given me opportunities to travel the world, work with celebrities, and capture some of life’s most meaningful moments for many people."

By Sky Braun

MFM Editor/Writer

Aiming toward a fusion of traditional and modern, I’d say Prachi Sharma, fashion photographer reigning from India, accomplished her goal. Incorporating this overall theme into not only the styling, but also the area’s culture and way of thinking, she further explained:  "The pictures come out as a tangent to the clichéd use of traditional costumes by keeping their ethnicity with a tinge of modernity. For example, as we are a part of this whole developing world where one cannot choose extremes such as ‘Am I a traditionalist or modernist?’ One generally tends to have flavors of both. Similarly, a modern woman here may not be a hardcore traditionalist or modernist but an evolution of both the forms, yet retaining her individuality. The modern fashion is reflected in her styling and the poses on one side while on the other, a traditional costume that has an amalgam of both the extremes and yet, can be worn in daily life."  The model chosen for this project, Farah Magi, is a blogger from a metropolitan city called Bangalore, a totally different city from the location of the shoot, not just in terms of geography, but also tradition, culture, and development. The location, Jaipur, India, was chosen for its historical roots in context of women, as they say it was built for the royal women to take a peek of street festivals, while remaining unseen indoors. Magi stated Jaipur has always fascinated her for its richness, both historically and culturally. She also shared that during her shoot, as a woman in the city, “which is still conventional in terms of culture, one does have to go through all the glaring and staring – not just by men, but curious women as well.”  Magi’s goal was to portray Jaipur from the perspective of an outsider. Therefore, she also wanted to shoot with a photographer born and raised in Jaipur, more than familiar with its culture. She very appropriately called the project a “collaboration of two creative minds and a juxtaposition of two distinct perspectives,” as she went on to explain, “we did not want to keep it completely ethnic and traditional. We kept the styling rather fresh and modern, but the soul was the beautiful heritage city that Jaipur is. We put a lot of love and care in picking out each and every single element. The crisp white shirt signifies the men of Jaipur: rather austere and sometimes defiant of cultural change. The skirt signifies the women of Jaipur: vibrant and multi-hued. The skirt and jewelry were sourced from the original Banjara tribes of Rajasthan; they're all handmade. I personally went down to the tribal village and requested them to sell it to me. The finishing touches were a pair of heels, disheveled hair, a negligent smoky eye and an attitude of nonchalance that only an urban outsider can permeate. It was a stark contrast between the old and the new.”  An excerpt from a post on her very own blog informs that:  "Jaipur – a city that a lot of people associate with women who cower to the trope of patriarchal wish fulfillment, creates interesting and layered narratives. It is the cultural miscellany with influences that are simultaneously global and local, that draws me towards this city. For me, it represents a city, which underlines the attempt made by a woman who steadily tries to enforce her agency in a corseted society. I met a lot of powerful women with a relentless heart, the real backbone behind this ‘heritage’ site. Women artisans keep the traditional crafts alive, lending the bazaars a wide array of colors that is not just limited to pink, and that is the sort [of] rainbow umbrella you want to be under. Gota Patti, Bandhani, Laheriya, Block-printing, Kinari, Tarkashi, Meenakari… and the list goes on and on. During this visit, I picked up one product with each of these traditional techniques just to keep in my bedroom and constantly keep inspiring myself. Jaipur, hence, is not just a single color. It is every single color in the spectrum. Albeit a relatively undercooked broth of female talent."  Clearly, being a photographer or model in these areas of India is not the easiest task, but it is as interesting as it is difficult, Sharma explained. Many factors play a role, ranging from access to locations, culture, gender, to language and so on. She reminds us of the positive though, by offering an alternate perspective. In a country with such diverse geography, terrain, and people, it is definitely possible to find and produce any kind of fashion shoot imaginable – if you’re as passionate and forward thinking as Prachi Sharma and Farah Magi, that is.  By Sky Braun  MFM Editor/Writer

Aiming toward a fusion of traditional and modern, I’d say Prachi Sharma, fashion photographer reigning from India, accomplished her goal. Incorporating this overall theme into not only the styling, but also the area’s culture and way of thinking, she further explained:

"The pictures come out as a tangent to the clichéd use of traditional costumes by keeping their ethnicity with a tinge of modernity. For example, as we are a part of this whole developing world where one cannot choose extremes such as ‘Am I a traditionalist or modernist?’ One generally tends to have flavors of both. Similarly, a modern woman here may not be a hardcore traditionalist or modernist but an evolution of both the forms, yet retaining her individuality. The modern fashion is reflected in her styling and the poses on one side while on the other, a traditional costume that has an amalgam of both the extremes and yet, can be worn in daily life."

The model chosen for this project, Farah Magi, is a blogger from a metropolitan city called Bangalore, a totally different city from the location of the shoot, not just in terms of geography, but also tradition, culture, and development. The location, Jaipur, India, was chosen for its historical roots in context of women, as they say it was built for the royal women to take a peek of street festivals, while remaining unseen indoors. Magi stated Jaipur has always fascinated her for its richness, both historically and culturally. She also shared that during her shoot, as a woman in the city, “which is still conventional in terms of culture, one does have to go through all the glaring and staring – not just by men, but curious women as well.”

Magi’s goal was to portray Jaipur from the perspective of an outsider. Therefore, she also wanted to shoot with a photographer born and raised in Jaipur, more than familiar with its culture. She very appropriately called the project a “collaboration of two creative minds and a juxtaposition of two distinct perspectives,” as she went on to explain, “we did not want to keep it completely ethnic and traditional. We kept the styling rather fresh and modern, but the soul was the beautiful
heritage city that Jaipur is. We put a lot of love and care in picking out each and every single element. The crisp white shirt signifies the men of Jaipur: rather austere and sometimes defiant of cultural change. The skirt signifies the women of Jaipur: vibrant and multi-hued. The skirt and jewelry were sourced from the original Banjara tribes of Rajasthan; they're all handmade. I personally went down to the tribal village and requested them to sell it to me. The finishing touches were a pair of heels, disheveled hair, a negligent smoky eye and an attitude of nonchalance that only an urban outsider can permeate. It was a stark contrast between the old and the new.”

An excerpt from a post on her very own blog informs that:

"Jaipur – a city that a lot of people associate with women who cower to the trope of patriarchal wish fulfillment, creates interesting and layered narratives. It is the cultural miscellany with influences that are simultaneously global and local, that draws me towards this city. For me, it represents a city, which underlines the attempt made by a woman who steadily tries to enforce her agency in a corseted society. I met a lot of powerful women with a relentless heart, the real backbone behind this ‘heritage’ site. Women artisans keep the traditional crafts alive, lending the bazaars a wide array of colors that is not just limited to pink, and that is the sort [of] rainbow umbrella you want to be under. Gota Patti, Bandhani, Laheriya, Block-printing, Kinari, Tarkashi, Meenakari… and the list goes on and on. During this visit, I picked up one product with each of these traditional techniques just to keep in my bedroom and constantly keep inspiring myself. Jaipur, hence, is not just a single color. It is every single color in the spectrum. Albeit a relatively undercooked broth of female talent."

Clearly, being a photographer or model in these areas of India is not the easiest task, but it is as interesting as it is difficult, Sharma explained. Many factors play a role, ranging from access to locations, culture, gender, to language and so on. She reminds us of the positive though, by offering an alternate perspective. In a country with such diverse geography, terrain, and people, it is definitely possible to find and produce any kind of fashion shoot imaginable – if you’re as passionate and
forward thinking as Prachi Sharma and Farah Magi, that is.

By Sky Braun

MFM Editor/Writer

"At the age of 17 while I was still finishing high school, I started to find myself extremely attracted to fashion. My family chose for me the wrong high school, but despite the fact I hated it, I did manage to discover what was really interesting to me: expressing myself as a creative person!  I must admit my mom had a big influence in my life for what I became today and what I have achieved. In fact, in my early teenage [years] I saw her loving fashion and encouraged me to watch fashion shows on television with her.  My typical day after school suddenly became a sort of imaginary internship for some designer. I soon realized I was fascinated and motived by three things: fashion design, quality craftsmanship and beauty in all things. I remember my evenings and weekends [were] spent sketching, pattern cutting, sewing and hand crafting clothing for myself and for my friends. Without knowing it, time after time I was improving the fashion skills I didn't even know I had. Very naturally, everything was coming together without any stress or pressure from anybody.  One year later I completed a summer internship for a well-known local menswear tailor-shop (in the south of Italy), where I mastered the art of technical pattern cutting, learning the old fashioned way to construct and shape garments. This [is] still one of my many passions in life...  Soon all my friends were asking me to design exclusive garments for them to go to parties. Every time I was creating a new design for them or for me I was embracing a new challenge and that was extremely exciting. The enthusiasm I had for this new passion was growing together with the experience day by day.  My mom said there was something special about me! She said I was born for fashion and I should have gone for it! She pushed me, encouraged me, and supported me as much as she could for me to approach this field.  At the age of 21 I was called for an interview for a fashion designer position. I didn't know much at the time, but my creativity got me into this amazing job with this local fashion company. Since then I developed my skills working for many different companies over the years in Italy, where I learned the design process from of all the amazing people I met in fashion. Working on various teams improved my techniques and ideas, and most of all gave me the possibility to learn new things every day.  At my early 30th I moved to London with great determination and enthusiasm, with the idea of learning something completely new and live in an international city, where things are really happening. Four years later, after a vast experience gained in UK, I finally decided to set my brand in London. Additional inspiration then was drawn from my adopted city of London, with its energy and vitality, its incredible landscapes with very old architecture [and yet] super modern, [as well.]  All of these things started to be referenced into the collections I designed as Daniele Bardis. For me, as an artist, the inspiration is paramount and I feed myself with all the things [that] are moving me into new ideas. This incredible city brought me into a completely new inspiration, embracing the beauty of the Gothic architecture of London. I fell in love with the features of the majestic Gothic buildings around the town, to the point I had a new vision that transformed my entire concept and inspiration, taking me to explore this new influence and giving me a brand new identity.  My love for leather as a natural material has always been a big thing when designing my women’s wear, and this way, with my new direction, I worked in a way [that] my leather garments could become my trademark. Today when creating garments, I select the best quality Italian fabrics and leathers. Quality is always paramount and this reinforces the brands idea for the clothing to be beautiful inside [and] out. Daniele Bardis also designs prints which are a mix of rich sophistication and innovative detailing, making the collections unique and instantly recognizable. Together with the intricate architectural design and never before seen quilting, the soft hand crafted leather jackets have become the brand’s trademark. All these creative elements culminate in a collection, which is easily and immediately understood.  All the things I do today are the outcome of great passion, of course, but also incredible dedication, perseverance and big drive. Without them, I would have not been here telling you my path as a self-taught fashion designer. Even today, I consider myself to be extremely hands-on and work very closely with my team to ensure the final product has the Daniele Bardis stamp of approval."  By Sky Braun  MFM Editor/Writer

"At the age of 17 while I was still finishing high school, I started to find myself extremely attracted to fashion. My family chose for me the wrong high school, but despite the fact I hated it, I did manage to discover what was really interesting to me: expressing myself as a creative person!

I must admit my mom had a big influence in my life for what I became today and what I have achieved. In fact, in my early teenage [years] I saw her loving fashion and encouraged me to watch fashion shows on television with her.

My typical day after school suddenly became a sort of imaginary internship for some designer. I soon realized I was fascinated and motived by three things: fashion design, quality craftsmanship and beauty in all things. I remember my evenings and weekends [were] spent sketching, pattern cutting, sewing and hand crafting clothing for myself and for my friends. Without knowing it, time after time I was improving the fashion skills I didn't even know I had. Very naturally, everything was coming together without any stress or pressure from anybody.

One year later I completed a summer internship for a well-known local menswear tailor-shop (in the south of Italy), where I mastered the art of technical pattern cutting, learning the old fashioned way to construct and shape garments. This [is] still one of my many passions in life...

Soon all my friends were asking me to design exclusive garments for them to go to parties. Every time I was creating a new design for them or for me I was embracing a new challenge and that was extremely exciting. The enthusiasm I had for this new passion was growing together with the experience day by day.

My mom said there was something special about me! She said I was born for fashion and I should have gone for it! She pushed me, encouraged me, and supported me as much as she could for me to approach this field.

At the age of 21 I was called for an interview for a fashion designer position. I didn't know much at the time, but my creativity got me into this amazing job with this local fashion company. Since then I developed my skills working for many
different companies over the years in Italy, where I learned the design process from of all the amazing people I met in fashion. Working on various teams improved my techniques and ideas, and most of all gave me the possibility to learn new things every day.

At my early 30th I moved to London with great determination and enthusiasm, with the idea of learning something completely new and live in an international city, where things are really happening. Four years later, after a vast experience gained in UK, I finally decided to set my brand in London. Additional inspiration then was drawn from my adopted city of London, with its energy and vitality, its incredible landscapes with very old architecture [and yet] super modern, [as well.]

All of these things started to be referenced into the collections I designed as Daniele Bardis. For me, as an artist, the inspiration is paramount and I feed myself with all the things [that] are moving me into new ideas. This incredible city brought me into a completely new inspiration, embracing the beauty of the Gothic architecture of London. I fell in love with the features of the majestic Gothic buildings around the town, to the point I had a new vision that transformed my entire concept and inspiration, taking me to explore this new influence and giving me a brand new identity.

My love for leather as a natural material has always been a big thing when designing my women’s wear, and this way, with my new direction, I worked in a way [that] my leather garments could become my trademark. Today when creating garments, I select the best quality Italian fabrics and leathers. Quality is always paramount and this reinforces the brands idea for the clothing to be beautiful inside [and] out. Daniele Bardis also designs prints which are a mix of rich sophistication and innovative detailing, making the collections unique and instantly recognizable. Together with the intricate architectural design and never before seen quilting, the soft hand crafted leather jackets have become the brand’s trademark. All these creative elements culminate in a collection, which is easily and immediately understood.

All the things I do today are the outcome of great passion, of course, but also incredible dedication, perseverance and big drive. Without them, I would have not been here telling you my path as a self-taught fashion designer. Even today, I consider myself to be extremely hands-on and work very closely with my team to ensure the final product has the Daniele Bardis stamp of approval."

By Sky Braun

MFM Editor/Writer

The international fashion weeks that we have all come to know and love are not limited to London, Milan, New York, and Paris. The city of Nizhny Novgorod is the third capital of Russia, after Moscow and St. Petersburg. And apparently all good things do come in threes, as its third season, appropriately donned NNFW (short for Nizhny Novgorod Fashion Week) just wrapped.

In its first season, a photographer whose work we have come to admire here at MFM, participated as a staff photographer. This season, Alexey Savinov received an offer as chief photographer. And “of course, I agreed without hesitation, because I am very passionate about fashion and everything connected with it,” Savinov continued, “For me, happiness is to be a part of the fashion industry in my hometown.”

It was an impressively large-scale event, especially considering its youth, and its success even more impressive. It attracted more public attention than ever before, with attendants of various media outlets, designers and buyers from all over Russia, Serbia, and the Netherlands, as well as all other positions within the fashion industry.

As the chief photographer, Savinov’s responsibilities included not only the search for a solid staff of photographers, but also the coordination of writing the technical regulations and structural organization of the actual runway. Assisting him with lighting were producers from all over the world. Lastly, promotional materials were of course needed, and Savinov shot these personally.

Some of the designers were familiar with Savinov, while others were just meeting him for the first time at the now annual NNFW. “All the designers presented very different collections, which is very pleasing. Some were very sophisticated wedding and formal dresses and gowns, such as Natalia Bogomolova Irina and Yashkina,” said Savinov. Irina’s collection was based on a combination of grey colors, some almost powdery. Her pieces have great attention paid to their intricate hand embroidery, and overall, the collection was graceful, airy, and delicate. “On the contrary, some designers stood out for their brightness,” Savinov transitioned. The brand "MUSH!" featured items like trendy pajama suits, dresses, lingerie style slip dresses, and of course the favorite handmade outerwear of coats, bombers, capes, and parkas. It’s worth mentioning the mission of MUSH!: to create trendy, stylish, yet affordable clothing that’s adapted to ordinary life without sacrificing its traditional perfect cut and fit.

Savinov finally exclaimed, “I cannot not mention designer ASIA SOLO.” The collection, ‘The Ruins of the Earl,’ plunged into the history of Russia. “I was very impressed with the combination of roughness, yet flowing jackets and delicate dresses,” he said.

Even though he is published in foreign journals, such as the U.S., South Korea, France, and Norway, Savinov works mostly in Russia. He believes the most important thing is to love what you do, “to invest my soul and energy, then everything will be at a high level.” Savinov also has an upcoming secret in the works, so stay tuned for his next conquest.

By Sky Braun

MFM Editor/Writer

PHOTOGRAPHER/EDITOR: NINA PAK MODELS: JAYDEN LINKLETTER, KRISTIN LINKLETTER, & MADISON RICE HAIR STYLIST: DREAMLOKA MUA: VIVIAN JUN PHOTO ASSISTANT: EDWIN HAURIS SET ASSISTANT: CHELSEA LINKLETTER

PHOTOGRAPHER/EDITOR: NINA PAK
MODELS: JAYDEN LINKLETTER, KRISTIN LINKLETTER, & MADISON RICE
HAIR STYLIST: DREAMLOKA
MUA: VIVIAN JUN
PHOTO ASSISTANT: EDWIN HAURIS
SET ASSISTANT: CHELSEA LINKLETTER

MFM first issue 5-edited 106 Part 4 space 4-4-4-4 PDF VOL 4 (2)21.png
With a respectable six years of painting under her belt, Yaël is a young artist from Antwerp, Belgium. A traveler, she writes about her unique view of the world and how she takes inspiration from it. Once a makeup artist, she is also hugely inspired by her past vocation, which is why she says she loves to paint women. Her medium is mostly acrylic on canvas, and “the emotions, colors and flavors in her work convey a lively, fresh and honest tone that immediately sets her apart,” as stated on her website: www.yaelhupert.com.  By Sky Braun  MFM Editor/Writer

With a respectable six years of painting under her belt, Yaël is a young artist from Antwerp, Belgium. A traveler, she writes about her unique view of the world and how she takes inspiration from it. Once a makeup artist, she is also hugely inspired by her past vocation, which is why she says she loves to paint women. Her medium is mostly acrylic on canvas, and “the emotions, colors and flavors in her work convey a lively, fresh and honest tone that immediately sets her apart,” as stated on her website: www.yaelhupert.com.

By Sky Braun

MFM Editor/Writer

 

 

 

Brigita is the embodiment of true beauty, and that’s why we, at MFM, are celebrating her as our very first Spotlight Model. After viewing these few images of her, you’d think she built an entire career around modeling. However, she studied IBM and medicine, works in a pediatric clinic, and does this “just for fun.” 

Things were not always fun for Alilovic, who was forced out of her own country during the war in Croatia. She said that she “moved to Switzerland and from there to Germany and then to the United States,” where she now identifies as a Ben and Jerry’s addicted “southern girl.” 

It comes as no surprise then that Brigita knows how to find the light, no pun intended, in situations. Some of her photo shoots, she admits, are nerve-wracking. So how does she manage to consistently translate “sexy” and “fun” as being synonymous on film? Well, she states that she personally does enjoy producing sensual images, though her reasoning carries a message that we all can’t help but love:

At 39 years young, Alilovic believes that “women [her] age don’t usually show themselves [this way.] That’s just wrong because at that age you’re still feminine, still sensual, and you know your body more than you did at 20-something.” 

She maintains successful, balanced relationships with many photographers after being in the industry for two decades, undoubtedly, in part, due to this often selfless perspective. After all, when prompted to contribute any last words, Alilovic concluded with many thanks and a “shout out to all women, especially [those] that are not 20 anymore – they are moms and businesswomen,” she continued, “so believe in your dreams and have fun in what you’re doing.” 

By Sky Braun

MFM Editor/Writer

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"Recently, I had the pleasure of attending LA Fashion Week with international fashion photographer, JB Jakubek, who photographed the entire event.

Among the designers at the event was Jason Ryan, who presented a stunning collection of menswear.

The collaborating designers were Danielle Yu and Mercedes Yvette, whose 24-carat custom-designed pieces of jewelry were the perfect finishing touch to Ryan’s Couture men’s line.

Yu and Yvette's jewelry brand, called “THE GILDED FOX," is internationally known for their intricate designs, patterns, cuts and close attention to detail.

It was an absolute pleasure being at LA Fashion Week and seeing the young jewelry designers rise to the top by creating something that the world will love. Their jewelry was timelessly elegant and absolutely breathtaking!"

By Alarick McGlory

MFM Editor-in-Chief